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Is Online Standardized Testing the Key to Ending Cheating?

In the wake of Atlanta's massive scandal, why aren't more states copying the SAT and GRE and moving their high stakes tests online?



With 178 educators implicated in Atlanta's massive standardized test cheating scandal, the integrity of high-stakes testing is coming under scrutiny. At the heart of the scandal: The allegation that teachers, school testing coordinators and principals erased student's incorrect answers and bubbled in correct responses. Atlanta isn't alone.

In my days working in schools, many teachers told me a similar story: Students they knew couldn't read on grade level somehow scored well on the reading comprehension sections of state tests. These teachers assumed that someone had gone through the testing booklet, erased the wrong answers, and penciled in the correct ones. Erasure patterns suggest that similar activity is happening in schools from Washington, D.C. to Houston.

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Lessons From the Military: What Can Schools Learn From Junior R.O.T.C. Programs?

Ninety-nine percent of students in the Army Junior R.O.T.C. program at Francis Lewis High School in Queens go on to college.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMliN4xhx_o&feature=player_detailpage
Love or hate the military, there is something to be said about the leadership, discipline, and responsibility it teaches. Those same high expectations are evident at the 17-year-old Army Junior R.O.T.C. program at Francis Lewis High School, a 4,000-student overcrowded school that serves a largely immigrant population in Queens, New York. The New York Times recently profiled the program, and in the video above, you can see it and the 741 cadets enrolled in it in action.

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Extra Credit: Ralph Nader Wants to End Athletic Scholarships

It's all about that college degree: what we're reading at GOOD Education HQ.


Just in time for the Elite Eight NCAA games, consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader is calling for an end to college athletic scholarships.

The head of the College Board, 71-year-old Gaston Caperton has announced he's stepping down in 2012. Caperton's held the job since 1999 and has overseen the number of students who take the SAT or AP exam skyrocket from 3 million to 7 million.

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