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Watch as Projected Poetry Lights Up This Mountain with Verse

Sir Walter Scott’s “On the Massacre of Glencoe” digitally illuminates the very landscape that inspired it.

image via youtube screen capture // 'On the Massacre of Glencoe' Projection Time-lapse - Sir Walter Scott

Two hundred-year-old poetry commemorating a 300-year-old conflict may not, at first, seem like the most exciting reading to those for whom poetry is not already a passion. That said, it’s hard not to appreciate the beauty of Sir Walter Scott’s “On the Massacre of Glencoe” after seeing it projected onto the side of the picturesque Scottish mountain Buachaille Etive Beag. Regardless of whether you’re a poetry fan or not, there’s something truly special about seeing Scott’s verse illuminate the very landscape from which it was inspired:

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Scotland’s Resolve to Kick Fossil Fuels by 2030 is Perfectly Feasible

By tapping and further developing their already robust stock of renewable energy resources, Scotland may very well achieve fossil fuel freedom in 15 years.

Photo courtesy Lumens Borealis

It’s a new year: Resolutions have been made. Scheme, sweat, and save all you want to achieve your latest iteration of “new year, new you,” but one country’s lofty, long term goal will likely dwarf your ambitions.

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How the Towns of Bland, Dull, and Boring Made Their Lame Names Work for Them

Small towns stuck with unfortunate or unusual appellations are a surprise hit with tourists

Last year, three little, oft-maligned towns across the world decided it was time to transcend their stigma and use their unfortunate names as a force for good. United by common pain—and the prospect of a little extra tourism—the municipalities of Bland, Australia; Boring, Oregon; and Dull, Scotland teamed up to create what they call the League of Extraordinary Communities, but which many have dubbed the Trinity of Tedium. Although part of the union is about reclaiming the joke of their names and having a good laugh themselves, it’s also just one of many strange bids by small towns to bring in a few extra dollars. And it appears to be working, which we can only hope means we’ll see more such confederacies soon.

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