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Social Engagement and Active Lifestyles Can Slow Down Cognitive Decline

A new study indicated that seniors who engage in meaningful social activities circumvent brain atrophy.

“Cognitive aging” is the term used by scientists to refer to the brain’s natural process of deteriorating after crossing a certain age. But cognitive aging isn’t a disease—it affects, or will affect, everyone in his or her lifetime. There are steps, however, that can be taken to slow down the brain’s decline.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found that seniors who engage in meaningful social activities circumvent brain atrophy.

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These Grandmas Smoke Pot For The First Time. And They Absolutely Love it.

They take a few epic bong rips before waxing poetic on the merits of ironing, mistake a vaporizer for a sex toy, and stonily lose track of whatever thoughts they were briefly attempting to articulate.

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Have you ever wanted to get your grandmother stoned, but were too embarrased to ask? These surrogate grannies got together to smoke some weed, so you can enjoy the experience of seeing a high senior without having to awkwardly pass your own grandma a doobie.

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These Older Women Will Forever Change the Way You Think About Fashion

The forthcoming documentary Advanced Style spotlights a group of inspiring women who don't allow their ages to dictate their fashion choices.

A few of the filmmakers' favorite subjects

Street style is really nothing new. From Berlin to New York to Mexico City to the suburbs, regular people have long been hopping out of bed, adorning themselves in clothing that make them happy, and peacocking down the street. But modern street style culture, like its refined older sister high fashion, is yet another victim of Western culture’s obsession with youth—young women in particular.

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Poking Holes in Obama's Praise of Denver's Bruce Randolph School

The school is graduating 97 percent of seniors, but how many students drop out senior year?


In this week's State of the Union address, President Obama praised Denver's Bruce Randolph Middle and High School as a model of education reform that works. Last year the campus, which was taken over by its teachers, graduated 97 percent of seniors despite being located in a low-income, urban area—something most similar high schools have yet to achieve. But is Bruce Randolph's success all that it's cracked up to be?

Mike Cohen, the head of the advocacy group Achieve, Inc., says that although that graduation rate is worthy of praise, there's a another data point the public needs to know.

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