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Chile Uses Earthquake Communication Technology To Saves Lives

On Monday evening a powerful earthquake shook northern Chile. Six people were reported to have been killed. The 8.2 magnitude quake also...

On Monday evening a powerful earthquake shook northern Chile. Six people were reported to have been killed. The 8.2 magnitude quake also triggered a six-foot tsunami. More lives could have been lost had it not been for the Chile's early tsunami warning system.\n

Chilean authorities warned people of the impending tsunami using Twitter, text messaging, and good old fashioned sirens. People quickly fled to higher ground after hearing the tsunami warning, remembering the huge earthquake of 2010.\n
In the immediate aftermath of the last large earthquake phone networks became critically overloaded. The BBC reports that in 2011 the Chilean government implemented a new instant alert technology. The software uses a geo-targeted system to allow authorities to send out simultaneous mass alerts across the internet, cell phones, television, and radio. The messages can be sent to millions within seconds, even when all systems are busy. \n

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For a South American Getaway, Cartagena Is the New Buenos Aires

If you’re looking to quit your life for a few months, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more enjoyable spot for relocation.

Colombia, to many Americans, is a land of narcotraffickers, kidnappers, and cocaine. Those things are certainly there if you go looking for them, but Colombia is safer that many tourists assume, and there are myriad options for any visitor, from hard-working Bogota to golden Barichara to salsa-infused Cali. But our favorite is the romantic, cobblestoned town of Cartagena de Indias.

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Uruguay's Schools Give Each Kid a Laptop, While America Twiddles Its Thumbs

One-to-one laptop programs in America are still novelties. In Uruguay, all elementary students have had a laptop since 2009.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPfKTdUfrVI&feature=player_detailpage

We spend a lot of time here in America debating the merit of providing a laptop to every student. Maine is still the only state to have a one-to-one laptop program for middle and high school students. In contrast, many of our global peers see the writing on the wall and know that computer literacy and learning with technology can't be optional in the 21st century. In particular, Uruguay's been rolling out one-to-one laptops at schools since 2009 through their Plan Ceibal program. Now that almost all students have access to computers, the South American nation is thinking about how to take the use of them to the next level.

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