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via Genius

For many years brands like Lonsdale, Fred Perry, and New Balance were the favored brands of right-wing fascists in Europe. The N on sneakers could easily be repurposed to reference Nazism, and the unofficial uniform of a shaved head, bomber jacket, and military boots acted as visual signifiers of group affiliation. But due to brand backlash, and in some cases, the outright banning of certain garments, far right-wingers have been forced to get a little more creative in their sartorial choices. One brand that saw room in the market for a new, Nazi-friendly line was Thor Steinar, a multimillion dollar label run from a small town on the fringes of Berlin, that uses the Nordic imagery and gothic lettering that has become a trademark of the subculture. Though on the surface they may look like Abercrombie & Fitch or Diesel, the company has subtly woven into its designs Nazi references such as a Messerschmitt aircraft and Germanic runes (among others).

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The forthcoming documentary Advanced Style spotlights a group of inspiring women who don't allow their ages to dictate their fashion choices.

A few of the filmmakers' favorite subjects

Street style is really nothing new. From Berlin to New York to Mexico City to the suburbs, regular people have long been hopping out of bed, adorning themselves in clothing that make them happy, and peacocking down the street. But modern street style culture, like its refined older sister high fashion, is yet another victim of Western culture’s obsession with youth—young women in particular.

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Big Stylish Brother: Live Streetcam 'Fashion' Site Snaps Pedestrians

The new website styleblaster.net lets you rank Williamsburg's most stylish, but is it an infringement of privacy?

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The project is the brainchild of Jules Laplace, a technical director at creative agency OKFocus, and his roommate, internet artist Jack Kalish. The camera points out of their apartment window. According to the website, the idea came in response to their changing neighborhood, which was once primarily artists, and is now occupied more and more by wealthier expats from Manhattan. They state:

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