GOOD

Best of 2013: The Future of Off-The-Grid Living Looks Promising

Best Of 2013: Energy-Efficient Buildings That Go Off The Grid

The word "sustainability" in architecture is open to interpretation. In the United States, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system is perhaps the most commonly used framework to measure a building's impact on the environment. While its implementation may make a structure greener, LEED has also been blamed for greenwashing—utilizing practices and products that claim to improve sustainability, when in fact those claims have not been proven and act merely as "green" vanity accessories.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Reduce, Repair, Reuse, Recycle, Reimagine for a Sustainable Snow Season

Nature won’t be here forever if we don’t all take some time to protect it.

The winter season is a magical time, my favorite of the year. The peaks and hills get covered in a fresh coat of white providing a palate for all of us artists to use our minds and imaginations to draw our own lines on the mountains. But they won’t be here forever if we don’t all take some time to protect them.

My dad is an environmental scientist, and I grew up on the beach in Southern California, but I was always drawn to the mountains—my name is Forrest, obviously. It's our duty and our job to help protect the places we love to go to—the oceans and the mountains. I got started with the nonprofit Protect Our Winters in order to do that. We recently got back from a trip to talk with senators on Capitol Hill and the White House to represent the winter sports community in discussing how climate change is impacting mountain communities. It's all about getting educated ourselves so we can educate others. It starts with these five: Reduce, Repair, Reuse, Recycle, Reimagine. Below are some additional ways you can be part of the solution:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Hey, I'm Walking in Los Angeles and You Can Too

Last year I gave a talk at the WIRED 2012 conference about the importance of designing our cities for walking: It's the simplest, fastest way to...

Last year I gave a talk at the WIRED 2012 conference about the importance of designing our cities for walking: It's the simplest, fastest way to make a city safer, healthier, and economically stronger. At the end, I mentioned that maybe the best way to make a city more walkable is to make walking a much more conscious act, with visual cues all over the city. My idea was to use the phrase "Hey, I'm walking here!"—what Dustin Hoffman's character Ratso Rizzo screams at a crosswalk-obstructing taxi in Midnight Cowboy.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

[vimeo][/vimeo]

Julia Iverson produced this well executed video for a class project. The assignment: Make algae biofuel accessible for a broad audience.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

American Neo-Gothic: Meet the Newest Crop of Farmers

Young farmers are knee deep in local agriculture and despite the huge challenges of making a living farming, they're thrilled with their calling.

In a time of deep economic uncertainty and concerns with our food system, interest is gaining around one of the oldest and most noble vocations. From Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Philomath, Oregon, these 21 young farmers are knee deep in local agriculture and despite the tremendous challenges of making a living farming, they're thrilled with their calling. Meet the newest crop of American farmers.

Keep Reading Show less
Slideshows

Feast Your Eyes: Shark Fin Fishing in Japan

The brutal Japanese shark fin trade is exposed in this new video—and a San Francisco-based reporter taste tests the resulting soup.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles