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Great News: Airport "Hydration Stations" Are Catching On

Add Atlanta's to the list of airports with handy "hydration stations" for your reusable water bottle. This idea is a no-brainer.

Even the most stalwart opponents of purchasing bottled water occasionally find themselves thirsty in a captive environment and opening their wallet in exchange for our most basic natural resource. Airports are one of these captive places, and not coincidentally, the cost of bottled water in airports is high. The recycling rate of these single-use plastic containers is very low.

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EPA: No More Rocket Fuel Chemical in Tap Water

At long last, the EPA has decided to limit the amount of perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel, in our drinking water.


Great news for anyone who drinks tap water. Yesterday, the EPA dropped this bombshell: the agency will regulate perchlorate in drinking water.

What is perchlorate? Just a major chemical ingredient in rocket fuel, fireworks, and other explosives. A toxic chemical linked to thyroid problems in pregnant women and young children that up until today has gone totally unregulated in drinking water, though it has been discovered coming out of the tap in at least 26 states. File under: long overdue.

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Bubbles Aren’t All Bad. Case in Point: Bubbly Tap Water Free Carbonated Tap Water and Other Good Uses of Bubbles

The financial bubble. The housing bubble. And now for a refreshingly different bubbly for the new year—free bubbly tap water.

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The financial bubble. The housing bubble. Petrochemicals bubbling up in the Gulf of Mexico. And now for a refreshingly different bubbly for the new year—free bubbly tap water.

It’s now on draft in New York City at places like Peel's and Brooklyn Farmacy. Chez Panisse in Berkeley has offered it since 2007. European cities are dispensing it in an effort to kick the bottled water habit. Venice gave out home carbonation kits to make its so-called “mayor’s water” frizzante and Paris now offers the bubbly—la pétillante—at a public water fountain in Jardin de Reuilly. Could bubbles reinvigorate the campaign for tap water?

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