GOOD

Pharrell and Timberland Turn Recycled Plastic Into Bee-Inspired Boots

The nature-friendly summer kicks have even been endorsed by the Queen Beyhive herself, Beyonce.

Just in time for summer, a buzzy new collaboration from Timberland and Pharrell Williams that’s also good news for nature’s tiniest friends. The boots, patterned to look like honeycombs and blades of grass, are produced with Bionic Canvas, a unique textile made from Bionic Yarn, a product co-created by Williams that utilizes organic cotton and recycled plastic bottles to produce a sustainable material. So far the boots have been a huge hit with trendsetters, including Beyoncé, who wore the shoes in her recent “Feeling Myself” music video with Nicki Minaj. Bee and Bey-friendly? We might just be feeling these kicks ourselves.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Will Satellite Surveillance Be Spring’s Biggest Fashion Muse?

Clothiers extraordinaire Betabrand teams up with satellite-creators Planet Labs to roll out a unique line of surveillance-based threads.

Sometimes staying grounded on terra firma just doesn’t get the creative juices flowing. Looking to the stars for inspiration, San Francisco-based clothier and design company Betabrand recently partnered with satellite-maker Planet Labs to create a capsule line of dresses, scarves, and jackets printed with images captured hundreds of miles above Earth. In the past, the group has printed everything from Amazon and Great Lakes-inspired leggings using Google Earth screenshots, to a brain scan dress. As the brand admits on its site, its always “been a little space-obsessed” so this chance to use real satellite imagery in its textiles has proved irresistible.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Wearable Instagram: Can Two Designers Revolutionize Photo Printing?

The Lumi Process brings photography printing into the sunlight, and let's people print on any natural fabric.

These days many avid photographers don't really think about printing their work, content to let it live on their phones, external hard drives, and social networks. But a new textile printing method that lets photographers, designers, and craftspeople print directly onto any natural fiber could change that mindset.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles