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Could This Be What the World’s First Truly Green City Looks Like?

A new project called OAS1S promises in the near future we’ll all be living in lush, garden communities.

Sure you’ve heard of green architecture, but what about a building made entirely from plants? A new proposal by Dutch experiential designer and architectural manager Raimond de Hullu (MSc), called OAS1S, promises that in the near future we might all be living in our very own garden homes. The project, which aspires to be the first 100 percent truly green building, offers up a vision of structures that are long and thin like trees with rooms stacked for maximum space (Think if government housing projects were modeled on Ferngully). The buildings would each be wrapped in foliage, and live “amongst a woodland within a city”—essentially a tree-based community within a larger metropolis.

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Meet the Mad Scientist Cooking up Human Hamburgers to Push the Boundaries of Future Foods

How lab-grown meat might save the environment, and make vegetarians of us all.

What if you could eat a cheeseburger made from Lady Gaga? Or taste the meat of the extinct dodo bird, but in nugget form? Bistro In Vitro hopes to make all of these culinary “delights” a reality in the not-too-distant-future. A self-proclaimed “virtual restaurant,” the all-digital bistro offers up food for thought rather than an actual menu, though it hopes some day to open a brick-and-mortar spot. The restaurant’s enigmatic creative director, Koert van Mensvoort, is an artist, scientist, philosopher, and the head of the Next Nature Lab. He has more than a few ideas on how we can both cut down on the destructive aspects of the meat industry and intro lab-grown options into our regular diet. “Lab meat has the potential to be more sustainable and animal friendly than current meat,” van Mensvoort recently proclaimed to GOOD, though he does admit there are “still many scientific hurdles” before a lab-grown leg of lamb lands on your dinner table.

(above) “Microbial Lamb’s Meat.” According to the site "this beautiful cut of microbial lamb has been prepared using minimal electricity, the power of beneficial bacteria and the natural fermenting process."

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Black Pete Survives Another Holiday Season

You’re damn right the traditional Dutch Christmas character is racist

Van Sinterklaas en Pieterbaas by S. Abramz, J. G. Kesler, illus. 3rd edition 1926. Via St.nicholascenter.org

Growing up, though we were infrequent churchgoers, Christmas was a huge deal in my family. Even during those years when my parents couldn’t afford the shiniest, most heavily advertised toys for my sister and I, they made up for it with a loving atmosphere, boatloads of decorations, and the kind of Christmas cheer that seems cheesy to my adult mind now, but meant the world to me on those early December mornings.

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The last match of World Cup 2010 is upon us. On Sunday at 2:30 p.m. eastern time, Spain and the Netherlands, arguably the two nations with the most tortured World Cup histories, will battle to become just the eighth champion of the world’s biggest sporting event. The global television audience should number about a billion. (In fact, all data on media coverage of the event is both awesome and terrifying.) Both teams are heirs to some serious history.

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