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Why Reading About the Rapture Leaves a Bad Taste in Your Mouth

New research is exploring the link between moral disgust and sensory disgust.

In a recent experiment, 82 undergrads, all self-described Christians, filed in for a test that researchers billed as a handwriting personality assessment.

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"I Don't Understand": How Rapture Believers Are Taking It

Bewilderment, sadness, and long drives home now await Harold Camping's gullible flock.


May 21, 2011, the date on which Harold Camping and his "Family Radio" church group believed the rapture was coming, came and went with no religious horrors of which to speak. Camping, an octogenarian who also wrongly predicted a 1994 rapture, has yet to address his followers, and reports say he's not entered or exited his California home since judgment day failed to appear.

Camping's many followers aren't remaining as mum, however, and a few have shared their sad, bewildering reactions with local reporters.

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Note from a Reluctant Christian: Believing in the Rapture Isn't So Crazy

Having been raised by a pastor, I understand why people believe in the impending rapture—even if I don't buy it myself.

In case you haven't heard, today is Judgment Day, at least according to the mathematical calculations of Harold Camping and his Oakland, California-based Christian organization, Family Radio. While I'm not currently a Bible-reading churchgoer, I grew up in the church with a pastor for a father, attended a Christian liberal arts college, and if forced to check a box under "religion,” would probably still identify as a “Christian." So even though I’m repulsed by people using Christianity to support regressive politics and can mostly join in the chuckling at people like Camping, I still find it hard to dismiss them completely.

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