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Meet the Climate Change Candidate Saying “We're All Going to Die”

If elected, Mike Beitik promises to do everything he can to reverse global warming.

Should you measure campaign slogans by their level of honesty, Mike Beitiks’ would win out pretty quickly. “We’re all going to die,” says the California-based candidate for U.S. Senate. And it’s true! We’re all going to die, indeed. Such is the nature of mortality. But Beitiks is less concerned with the natural course of human life than he is with the perilous outcomes of climate change. He’s running his campaign on the promise that he’ll put all his energy and resources towards the goal of lowering CO2 emissions and saving the environment.

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Terrorism Experts Gather to Discuss the Memes of War

Sen. Cory Booker says we’re spending too much money on old-school media.

Image via screencapture.

U.S. Senators convened for a Senate hearing on Thursday to discuss “Jihad 2.0: Social Media in the Next Evolution of Terrorist Recruitment” (or, alternatively titled, “How to Harness the Virality of Sick-Ass Memes to Fight Terrorism”). Resident Twitter expert, Sen Cory Booker (D-N.J.), addressed a team of national security and terrorism experts—who, by the way, spoke exclusively about Muslim terrorists, so we’re forced to assume that Muslims are the only terrorists worth fighting or holding a Senate hearing about—about the nature of terrorist messaging to young kids on social media and whether we can replicate the power of “fancy memes” for counter-terrorism messaging.

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Bipartisan Medical Marijuana Bill Would End Federal Ban

35 States have some kind of medical marijuana. Isn’t it about time the federal government got with the program?

Photo by Laurie Avocado via Wikimedia Commons

Yesterday, United States Senators Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand, and Rand Paul presented a new bill that would dramatically shift the federal government’s long-time position on medical marijuana. The law would effectively end the nominal national ban on the drug, opening up avenues for states to pursue medical programs without interference from Washington.

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