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Walkable Cities are Good News for Small Business

Cities that support getting out of the car are better for small businesses, and the trend towards walkable cities is only speeding up.



When a city is more walkable—supporting pedestrians with narrower streets, wide sidewalks, and nearby recreational outlets—shops are frequented more often and do far better than those in less walkable areas.

A report issued by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that “businesses appear to do better in a walkable commercial areas than in areas attracting mainly drive-to patronage.”

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Another Study Proves What We Already Knew: Walkability Improves Quality of Life

According to a new study how walkable your neighborhood is directly impacts your quality of life.

We all know that walking is good for our health but a new study suggests that it may also be a key factor in quality of life. According to the report, walkability increases social capital-a measure of networks, connections, and community involvement- and as social capital increases so does one's quality of life. From the report:

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Walk Score Ambles into 2,500 New Cities

The Walk Score website expands its excellent walkability rankings to cover 2,500 new cities. See how pedestrian-friendly your neighborhood is.


Walking. It's a way of getting around that doesn't pollute, improves your health, saves you money, and, unlike driving, might even result in nice, spontaneous interactions with your neighbors.

In 2007, to promote walkable neighborhoods, Matt Lerner and Mike Mathieu, two former Microsoft employees, came up with Walk Score. Using a novel 100-point scale, the Walk Score website gives neighborhoods a walkability rating based on the nearby availability of grocery stores, restaurants, schools, and other important everyday needs. It allows renters, realtors, community activists, and curious citizens to compare how pedestrian-friendly a neighborhood is.

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