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Redesigning City Streets with a Mobile Phone

Key to the Street is a cloud-based service that allows anyone with a mobile device to participate in the design of public spaces.

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Walkable Neighborhoods Can't Just Be For Rich People

Right now, only the wealthiest people can afford to live in the most walkable neighborhoods. That needs to change.


Most Americans want to live in walkable neighborhoods, but only a fraction can afford it. Housing in places with easy access to stores, restaurants, jobs, and public transit is in short supply, and only about a third of those who say they want to live in walkable neighborhoods actually do. Aaccording to a new study, the people lucky enough to live in the most walkable neighborhoods are often also be the most well-off.

Brookings Institution researchers Christopher Leinberger and Mariela Alfonzo set out to create metrics for judging a neighborhood’s walkability and monitoring its progress. They picked a sample of neighborhoods in the Washington, D.C., area and, by examining several aspects of each one, assigned each a walkability score between one and five.

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Another Study Proves What We Already Knew: Walkability Improves Quality of Life

According to a new study how walkable your neighborhood is directly impacts your quality of life.

We all know that walking is good for our health but a new study suggests that it may also be a key factor in quality of life. According to the report, walkability increases social capital-a measure of networks, connections, and community involvement- and as social capital increases so does one's quality of life. From the report:

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