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Redesigning City Streets with a Mobile Phone

Key to the Street is a cloud-based service that allows anyone with a mobile device to participate in the design of public spaces.

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Walk to Work Day: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly

WalkSanDiego presented an opportunity to promote walking and walkability, and it gave me a chance to make some observations along the way.


This story first appeared on walksandiego.org

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Urban planners have a new weapon they can use to fight for more walkable cities: a 10-year study from Australia that says designing pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods directly improves the health of the local community. It's common sense, but this is the largest major study giving concrete proof of how much of a difference good design can make for health.

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Walk Score Ambles into 2,500 New Cities

The Walk Score website expands its excellent walkability rankings to cover 2,500 new cities. See how pedestrian-friendly your neighborhood is.


Walking. It's a way of getting around that doesn't pollute, improves your health, saves you money, and, unlike driving, might even result in nice, spontaneous interactions with your neighbors.

In 2007, to promote walkable neighborhoods, Matt Lerner and Mike Mathieu, two former Microsoft employees, came up with Walk Score. Using a novel 100-point scale, the Walk Score website gives neighborhoods a walkability rating based on the nearby availability of grocery stores, restaurants, schools, and other important everyday needs. It allows renters, realtors, community activists, and curious citizens to compare how pedestrian-friendly a neighborhood is.

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Walkability is Now a Buzzword

Rockport shoes new campaign features two attractive 20-somethings walking the streets of New York, attracted no doubt by each others' comfy shoes.


Forget pheromones or sports cars; walkability is the new aphrodisiac. Rockport shoes new campaign features two incredibly attractive 20-somethings walking the streets of New York, ultimately meeting up for a latte, attracted no doubt by each others' comfy shoes.

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