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Your College's Endowment Is Probably Supporting Shady Businesses

A new report shows that only 18 percent of America's colleges have socially conscious criteria for investing their massive stockpiles of money.

A generation ago American college students successfully pressured their schools to divest their multimillion-dollar endowments from apartheid South Africa, which helped bring an official end to the racist policies and proved to the world that economic sanctions work. However, despite being pioneers in socially responsible investing, a new report from the Investor Responsibility Research Center Institute and the Tellus Institute reveals that when it comes to investing based on environmental, social, and corporate-governance goals, the nation's colleges and universities are no longer leading the way.

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This Millionaire Is Wrong: Inequality Isn't the Key to Economic Success

A millionaire makes the case that inequality makes the world go 'round. His world, maybe.


Take it from multimillionaire Edward Conard: Income inequality is a good thing. We need to bail out the banks more in the future. Wealthy people are wealthy because they’ve done so much to benefit society at large. Living off investment income is a higher moral good than charity.

Conard, a banker who earned his fortune at the same company as Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, makes these statements in a new book, which he calls a rebuttal to Occupy Wall Street, the Obama administration, and anyone who questions the advantages of the super-wealthy in society.

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Dear Ezra: Wall Street was No Match for a Liberal Arts Degree

WaPo's Ezra Klein thinks elite college grads head to Wall Street because their liberal arts degrees are failing them. One former analyst disagrees.

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Are MBAs Ditching Investment Banking for Social Entrepreneurship?

Gordon Gekko would be shocked: Social entrepreneurship is hot at business schools.

Gordon Gekko would be shocked. A piece in The New York Times, "Business Schools with Social Appeal", spotlights the growing number of business schools offering degrees in social entrepreneurship. Now that it's clear tackling social problems with business-style solutions is popular, business schools are jumping on the bandwagon.

What's behind the shift? Today's business school applicant is more socially aware and open to working with nonprofits and non-governmental organizations, and less interested in the traditional MBA fields of consulting and investment banking.

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Geoffrey Canada Tells Stephen Colbert Racism Has Nothing to Do with the Achievement Gap

The Waiting for Superman star says teachers unions are to blame for everything wrong in public education.

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Why isn’t public education fixed yet? According to the Harlem Children’s Zone founder and Waiting for Superman star Geoffrey Canada, if teachers unions didn’t exist, all would be well in our nation’s schools. Such talk is par for the course for Canada, but on Tuesday night’s episode of The Colbert Report, he added something new to his education reform spiel. Canada claimed that racism has nothing to do with the achievement gap.

When Colbert asked Canada to explain what the achievement gap is, Canada replied, “As soon as we can test kids, we find between a 25- to 35-point difference between white kids and black kids in math and in reading.”

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