GOOD

Murdoch's PR Problem: Two Experts Do Damage Control

After the News of the World scandal, Murdoch's other outlets need to assure us they're legit. Experts tell us how.


When the news got out that Rupert Murdoch's British paper News of the World had illictly hacked into cellphones, the paper folded and people called for a boycott of the gargantuan Murdoch empire. Unfortunately, as we mentioned last week, the latter is nearly impossible given how many outlets fall under the umbrella of News Corporation's media conglomerate. Some of them, including Fox News and the New York Post, aren't exactly known for their ethics, but others are highly respected, especially the venerable Wall Street Journal.

Just because a major boycott isn't likely, that doesn't mean the public is feeling warm and fuzzy toward News Corporation. The media company has a major PR problem on their hands, a scandal that goes beyond an isolated incident and delves into huge issues of press regulation and media standards. How can News Corp make us feel better about consuming its products, if even its own CEO seemed to have no idea how the company is run? I solicited advice from experts on how outlets like the Journal can win back the public's trust.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Americans Now Spend $1.2 Trillion a Year on Stuff We Don't Need

A new study says more than 11 percent of consumer spending is now dedicated to nonessential goods.


What recession? Despite the fact that most Americans are still struggling in the worst economy since the Great Depression, a "non-scientific study" from the Wall Street Journal says that U.S. citizens now spend $1.2 trillion annually on nonessential goods. For context, that's more than 11 percent of overall consumer spending.

A decade ago, nonessential goods amounted for only about 9 percent of consumer spending, and in 1959, that number was 4 percent, adjusted for inflation. By contrast, this year, nonessential goods purchases are up 3.3 percent from where they were last year, while spending on stuff that really matters—food, shelter, medicine, etc.—is up only 2.4 percent.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Should a Teacher's Value-added Score Be Made Public?

New York City's teachers' union wants to keep teacher performance data from being released. What's to hide?

Should the names of teachers and the test scores of their students be made public? Not according to the United Federation of Teachers, which represents New York City's public school teachers. Earlier today, the union's lawyers presented oral arguments to the New York Supreme Court in Manhattan to keep the New York City Department of Education from giving media outlets the names of teachers and their student's test results

These "Teacher Data Reports" for the city's fourth through eighth grade math and English teachers include what the union calls, "fundamentally flawed" value-added data, "based on the students' standardized test scores, which themselves were found to be inflated and inaccurate."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Eating the Wall Street Journal

It's a performance piece featuring an artist eating and then vomiting up the Wall Street Journal.

Articles

WSJ: Me Talk Objectively One Day

This is nice: The Wall Street Journal is going to stop using the term "death tax" to describe the estate tax, a tax on inheritance: ...the term...

Keep Reading Show less
Articles