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What Do Young People Around the World Have in Common? No Jobs

For the first time since the 1960s, a majority of young people lack work.


The Moroccan protestors pictured here speak Arabic, but they're talking the same language as the young Americans demonstrating for economic justice in the United States: They're demanding more opportunity. Despite the middling recovery, youth unemployment in the United States remains at the same levels that put protesters on the streets in the Middle East.

In the U.S., the percentage of 16-to-24-year-olds who are employed has been falling since the 2000 recession. For the first time since the 1960s, when women entering the workforce led to a big increase in youth employment, a majority of young people are out of work. The story is the same around the world: A new report [PDF] shows the global youth unemployment rate hitting 12.6 percent.

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The New York Times' "Room for Debate" Continues Snubbing Minority Thinkers

In discussing the world's diverse population, the "paper of record" once again turns to a bunch of middle-aged white men.

We've told you before that the New York Times' "Room for Debate" section, in which thought leaders discuss the news of the day, has a problem when it comes to including diverse voices. Though the topics broached in Room for Debate are frequently near and dear to the hearts of people of all colors, for whatever reason, the Times has on several occasions neglected to include the opinions of even a single minority. We called it the paper's "white people problem"; Nation editor Chris Hayes called it their "non-white people" problem. Regardless of what you call it, it's a problem, and it doesn't appear to be getting any better.

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Yesterday on Twitter, and Facebook, we asked our friends: If the whole world were listening, what would you say?

We ask a question to our Twitter and Facebook faithful once a day, so if you’re not yet following @GOOD or a fan, make sure to sign up and participate in the conversation.

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