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It's World AIDS Day But Half of Youth With HIV Don't Know it

We need to do more to educate our youth on the HIV/AIDS crisis.


I am 27 years old and I've never known a world without HIV/AIDS. As part of the first generation born into this epidemic, people my age and younger have always had to deal with a world where sex was not just bringing life but it was potentially taking it, too. You’d think we'd be more conscious of the implications of this epidemic, since in our world, sex has always included the threat of HIV. However, it seems that young folks aren't taking HIV/AIDS as seriously as they should.

This past week, the Center for Disease Control released statistics saying people ages 13-24 are a quarter of new HIV infections in the United States, and half of them don't even know they're infected. As we make some strides in the fight against HIV, hearing statistics like this can be disheartening because it feels like we’re moving backwards. Young people are increasingly infected with HIV, and we need to fix it now. But how?

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Celebrity Blackout on Twitter and Facebook for World AIDS Day [UPDATED] Digital Life Sacrifice: Celebrities Go Silent on Social Media for World AIDS Day [UPDATED]

Celebrities go silent on Twitter and Facebook for World Aids Day. The only way to get Lady Gaga tweeting again is to fork over money for the cause.


Can you go without Lady Gaga tweets for a day? On Wednesday you might have to. It's part of a $1 million fundraiser for World AIDS Day called Digital Life Sacrifice. Lady Gaga, Usher, Justin Timberlake, Alicia Keys, and others all plan to deprive their fans of momentary musings until the fans donate $1 million to Alicia Keys AIDS charity Keep A Child Alive. Think of it as celebrity social media extortion for a good cause.

Keys made the recruiting calls personally. Each celebrity will also appears in a "last tweet and testament" video to make the point that we Americans care tremendously about the loss of a single celebrity life, but ignore the tragedy of millions of AIDS deaths. The money goes to treatment for children with HIV/AIDS in India, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and South Africa.

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