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Starting a PULSE Across the Nation: Why Heart Health Matters Most to Me

We are inundated with numbers and statistics on a daily basis. At times these statistics can seem just like mere numbers or they can seem so overwhelming that we are left asking ourselves, "Where do we even start to solve the problem?" What is even more amazing is how these numbers can begin to represent a unique story, with a much deeper meaning when replaced with the face of a loved one or a peer.

“The morning of September 12, 2012 I had a stroke. I was an athletic and healthy 24-year-old who had no idea what the stroke symptoms were. Despite my lack of knowledge I was one of the lucky few that received treatment in time. I was given a TPA or ‘clot-busting’ shot with very few minutes to spare in the three-hour window for which the drug could be used post-stroke onset. Miraculously, I have no residual effects on my brain. Since then I have dedicated much of my time to sharing my personal story with others to encourage stroke prevention and awareness. It is imperative to educate the next generation of community leaders about heart health and stroke prevention,” says Bri Winkler, a fellow PULSE committee member from the American Heart Association (AHA) Los Angeles Chapter.

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Young Professionals Head to Spin Class to Support Afterschool Program

The nation's oldest after school program, LA's BEST, is giving folks a workout—and letting them make a difference in the lives of kids.


Ready to sweat in spin class and do some good for the kids? One hundred young Los Angeles professionals are heading to Sports Club/LA today to participate in the second annual indoor cycling fundraiser for the nation's oldest after-school enrichment program, LA's BEST. The cyclists hope to raise $50,000, money that will help provide safe, supervised after-school education to low-income students across Los Angeles.

The program serves 28,000 kids at 180 elementary school sites across Los Angeles, working specifically in "neighborhoods most vulnerable to gangs, drugs, crime and at schools with the lowest student test scores." Stefanie Schwartz, Nickelodeon's vice president of marketing and production, said participating in the fundraiser is important to her because for so many low-income students LA's BEST "is their only exposure to amazing enrichment activities." David Freedman, the vice-chair of the BEST friends board echoes Schwartz sentiments, adding that his fund raising efforts allowed him to get his friends and coworkers involved in the program. "I think they’re great for showing up for the kids with their financial support," he said.

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