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Take a moment to think about your trashcan. How much time does it take to fill it up? What’s the least amount of waste you’ve ever been able to throw away in a week? The world’s largest manufacturer of consumer packaged goods, Procter & Gamble, is working to effectively eliminate waste to landfill from their factories worldwide. Since even the most efficient operations have waste, P&G created a team in 2007 to turn its manufacturing waste into something with of worth. Forbes McDougall, P&G’s Global Wastestreams leader, oversees the program in P&G plants across the globe. “We focus on a partnership approach with our sites and leverage the intellectual capacity of our waste management partners,” says McDougall.

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How San Francisco is Working to Become a Zero Waste City

Brought to you by IBM. Join GOOD for a live tweet chat today about how trash collection can go from "waste management" to "resource recovery."


This message is brought to you by our partner, IBM

Join GOOD and IBM for a live tweet chat on Friday, June 1 at 1 p.m. ET (#zerowasteIBM) about the future of recycling and how trash collection can go from "waste management" to "resource recovery." Instead of taking all collected trash straight to landfills, companies like Recology are rethinking how to manage the waste stream. Teaming up with IBM, Reoclogy is working to make San Francisco a zero waste city by using data to tailor recycling management to specific neighborhoods, as well as composting and extracting reusable items before they reach landfills.

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