Amy Trask Literally Wrote The Book On Women In The NFL

The former CEO found success with one of America’s most famous sports franchises

Thirty percent of the National Football League’s (NFL) front-office jobs are currently held by women. One of the first to make her mark there was Amy Trask. The Angeleno’s 30-year stint with the Oakland—then Los Angeles—Raiders began with an unpaid internship and progressed to CEO. Indeed, at one point, Trask was the only woman in the room at NFL owners meetings. Trask resigned from the Raiders in 2013.

Recently, the NFL announced its commitment to the inclusion of women beyond the front office. As the organization’s new director of football development, Sam Rapaport is encouraging women to step into positions from scouting to coaching. It’s definitely been a time for firsts, with Sarah Thomas serving as an official; Jen Welter coaching with the Arizona Cardinals; Kathryn Smith coaching with the Buffalo Bills; and Cathy L. Lanier coming on board as the NFL’s head of security.

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This content is brought to you by GOOD, with support from IBM. Click here to read more stories from The Fact That Changed Everything series and here to read about other Figures of Progress.

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The Fact That Changed Everything: Jacob Lief and Ubuntu Education Fund

This content is brought to you by GOOD, with support from IBM. Click here to read more stories from The Fact That Changed Everything series and...

This content is brought to you by GOOD, with support from IBM. Click here to read more stories from The Fact That Changed Everything series and here to read about other Figures of Progress.

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The Fact That Changed Everything: David Isay and StoryCorps

"I wanted to make sure no one ever made the idiotic mistake I did of losing the voice of a loved one."

This content is brought to you by GOOD, with support from IBM. Click here to read more stories from The Fact That Changed Everything series and here to read about other Figures of Progress.

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The Fact That Changed Everything: Father Boyle and Homeboy Industries

To combat gang violence, one man wondered: What if we invest in people rather than just trying to incarcerate our way out of the problem?


This content is brought to you by GOOD, with support from IBM

An inviting pop of orange on the corner of Bruno Street in Los Angeles’ Chinatown invites patrons into Homegirl Café. During breakfast hours, plates of chilaquiles are being served up alongside fresh baked goods. In short order, however, it’s apparent this is no typical café. Indeed, a daily gathering is taking place in a lobby adjoining the café. This is the headquarters of Homeboy Industries, an organization that serves high-risk, recently incarcerated and former gang-involved youth through counseling, education, tattoo removal, legal services, job training and job placement. As usual, the morning meeting is standing room only.

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On the Market Watch: Knewton's Educated Approach to Marketing

Brought to you by IBM. The COO of an online education site talks about how marketing crosses into his domain as his users and services grow.


In this four-part series, we interview industry leaders about how technology and business are evolving the way companies use marketing and social media. This post is brought to you by our partner, IBM.

Knewton is an educational platform dedicated to a more innovative approach to online learning. On a mission to share knowledge on an international level, Knewton's unique Adaptive Learning Platform tailors lessons to each individual learner. To hear more about how Knewton markets its business model and connects with its global audience, we caught up with CEO David Liu. After earning an MBA from Columbia Business School, Liu served as a Senior Vice President at AOL. And did we mention he’s been awarded a patent for web-based content personalization, too? Liu shares with GOOD how aspects of marketing often cross into his domain as Knewton continues to grow and expand.

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