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Here’s Why You’re Hearing About The Paris Climate Change Agreement Again

Typos, magic numbers, big moves by China and the U.S.—it’s been a big few weeks for the treaty

A Chinese man wears a mask to protect against pollution as he visits Jingshan Park overlooking the Forbidden City in heavy smog in Beijing, China on December 8, 2015—a few days before COP21. Image via Getty images by Kevin Frayer

On December 12, 2015, the world did something remarkable: 180 countries came together in Paris for COP21 (here’s a refresher) and agreed to fight climate change, outlined in a document called the Paris Agreement. We solved climate change and saved the planet—right?

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The Corporate Polluters Paying for COP21

Companies with ties to the electric, car, and coal industries now have the “COP21 seal of approval.”

Image via Flickr user Paris Climate. Credit: Joel Lukhovi | Survival Media Agency

Intuitively, it’s probably pretty obvious that getting 190 countries with competing interests to agree on a single global deal to fight climate change is a challenge. Throw 40,000 delegates, observers, and members of the press into the mix, and the difficulty multiplies by orders of magnitude. The venue is massive, and there’s electricity, catering, transportation, and security to think of. The total price tag for the whole lot: approximately $190 million. Who’s supposed to pay for it all?

The United Nations simply doesn’t have that kind of money lying around. So for better or worse, French Foreign Minister and president of the conference Laurent Fabius has turned to corporations for support. Getting private companies involved in the U.N. climate negotiations has been a contentious matter, especially this year, when many see the nearly 64 sponsors’ lobbying-through-sponsorship to be a bad influence on negotiators who are set to sign a final agreement next week.

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Why Climate Talks Matter in the Age of Terrorism (UPDATED)

A successful climate conference will result in a safer world.

The French president minced no words in the wake of Friday’s attacks: “Terrorism will not destroy the French Republic because it is the Republic that will destroy it.” Image via Instagram user @fhollande.

On November 13, the world watched as terrorists systematically attacked Paris, killing at least 130 people and wounding several hundred more. In the face of unimaginable tragedy, the City of Light knew all too well that it needed to show resolve. President Francois Hollande pulled out of the G20 summit this week in Turkey in order to address his nation, controversially declaring that France was “at war” with ISIS. In a key move, he also stated that the COP21 Paris climate talks would go on as scheduled in just two weeks.

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The Artistic Education of Ms. Marvel’s “Mighty Muslim” Co-Creator

The superhero world’s first-ever Muslim Pakistani-American teenage girl is the product of a creative mind and great mentors.

Ms. Marvel No. 2 by variant cover artist Jorge Molina

It’s undeniable that the majority of comic books are made by and for men. According to comics historian and researcher Tim Hanley—who regularly “gendercrunches” the industry’s demographics—male comics creators outnumbered female nine-to-one as recently as December of 2014. And last June, Hanley found that 79 percent of comic editors, inkers, pencillers, and cover artists were white, as well.

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