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Image via Chokal-Ingam's website, Almost Black.

On a list of things you should never, ever do, pretending to be a black person to get into college ranks pretty high on the list. Mindy Kaling’s brother, Vijay Chokal-Ingam, who appears to have no notable credit to his name besides being Mindy Kaling’s brother, did exactly that, and in a dubious effort to discredit affirmative action programs, he’s going to write about it in his forthcoming book, Almost Black (or, as I will heretofore refer to it, Academic Blackface).

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The Perils and Possibilities of an America Without Affirmative Action

Those who support affirmative action have to prepare for an America without it.


How much diversity on campus is enough? When it comes to the use of race in college admission policies raised by the case Fisher v. University of Texas, that's the question Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts wanted answered during the oral arguments recently presented to the Court. I have a different set of questions: How do those who support affirmative action—and race-conscious policies in general—prepare for an America without them? Secondly, would an America without them be so bad?

Some consider a post-affirmative action America a triumph of post-racialism, some view it as the prelude to a racial apocalypse, and still others fall somewhere in the middle. Whether you are for or against it, the future of affirmative action is questionable at best. While it's true that certain sectors of our society such as business and higher education continue to support the practice, it's less popular among the general public.

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Why Do We Keep Debating Race-Conscious College Admissions?

A lawsuit against the University of Texas' use of race in admissions is set to be heard by the Supreme Court. Not even Walmart supports it.

The spring of my senior year of high school one of my teachers asked everyone in class to share where they'd been accepted to college. I was thrilled that I'd been accepted at my dream school, Northwestern University, but it turned out that a white classmate who'd applied there hadn't gotten in. Although I was acing my honors and AP courses and had stellar SAT scores, I suddenly found myself in the middle of a class debate over whether I had been accepted at Northwestern solely because I was black. The student who hadn't been accepted complained that I'd probably taken her spot at the school.

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Do We Need College Scholarships for White Men?

A new Texas nonprofit says being male and white doesn't help you pay for college, so they're starting a scholarship program just for white men.


A Texas nonprofit's plan to offer five $500 scholarships to white men is putting conventional wisdom about white male privilege and the ability to pay for higher education in the spotlight. According to the Former Majority Association for Equality—named because white people are no longer the racial majority in Texas—being a white male isn't an asset when it comes to access to college scholarships because they don't "fit into certain categories or ethnic groups."

FMAE president Colby Bohannan served in the military in Iraq, but says that when he returned to Texas and hunted around for ways to pay for school, he felt left out because he isn't female or a member of a minority group. A low-income white male doesn't have, as Bohannan told CNN, "a bunch of money sitting around" to pay for college.

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