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Why Good Fences Make Bad Neighbors: Annie Leonard's Backyard Commune

When my daughter was in second grade, a friend invited her to come skiing at Lake Tahoe. She begged me to go, but not being a skiier myself, I...

When my daughter was in second grade, a friend invited her to come skiing at Lake Tahoe. She begged me to go, but not being a skiier myself, I didn’t even know what stuff she needed. So that night I sent an email out to the other families of my kampung—an Indonesian word for a small village which we use to describe our community. When I got home from work the next day, there were bags full of children’s ski gear and ski clothes on my front porch.

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unPAC Design Challenge: Join Shepard Fairey and Lawrence Lessig To Take Back Congress

Throughout history, art has inspired action. Now unPAC, a coalition of organizations that believes our political process has become hijacked by...



Throughout history, art has inspired action. Now unPAC, a coalition of organizations that believes our political process has become hijacked by the super-rich, super-PACS, and other special interest forces, is asking the public to create an iconic image that will inspire people to tell Congress that our campaign finance system is undemocratic and corrupt and must be fixed.

unPAC believes that an iconic image can move citizens to speak up to Congress about our broken campaign finance system, and that if we speak up, we will be more powerful than the corporations and few wealthy individuals who are pouring millions of dollars to fund the campaigns of our political representatives.

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Video: New Story of Stuff Explains Corporate Money in Politics

In season two of The Story of Stuff, Annie Leonard tackles corporate money in politics with this animated explainer of the Citizens United ruling.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5kHACjrdEY

Annie Leonard has kicked off season two of The Story of Stuff. Last season she focused on our excessive consumption habits with charming, well researched—if a touch overgeneralized—animated short films. This new video takes aim at "the crisis of corporate influence in American democracy."

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The Story of Cosmetics

If you've been hanging out on the site lately, you know we've been doing a lot of writing about cosmetics, personal-care products, sunscreen,...


If you've been hanging out on the site lately, you know we've been doing a lot of writing about cosmetics, personal-care products, sunscreen, and the like in our No More Dirty Looks series. Based on a book I wrote with my friend Alexandra Spunt, the series is our attempt to share what we've learned about the health and environmental impacts of all the goop we put on ourselves every day.

Anyway, the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics has been working tirelessly to change legislation since 2004, and today they have some huge news. First, they announced the introduction of new legislation by Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-IL), and second, they have launched this amazing new video with the Story of Stuff Project. It's eight minutes long, and you should watch all eight of them.

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The Bottled Water Industry Fights Back

Prompted in part by Annie Leonard's new video "The Story of Bottled Water," the International Bottled Water Association released a video of their...

Prompted in part by Annie Leonard's new video "The Story of Bottled Water," the International Bottled Water Association released a video of their own extolling the virtuous conduct of bottled water companies.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iExU-NT-RlA

It's great that bottled water companies recycle and support environmental organizations, but that doesn't change the fact that the core of their business is taking private control of a free public resource on which our lives depend, packaging it in disposable plastic junk, and selling it back to people at a huge profit.

But what about emergency provisions? From the press release that came with the video:

Floods, wildfires, hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes, terrorist attacks, boil alerts and other events often compromise municipal water systems. IBWA members contribute millions of gallons of water each year to the affected victims. Lifesaving bottled water cannot be available in times of pressing need without a viable, functioning industry to produce it.

I'm not sure we need a commercial bottled water industry to prepare for emergencies. Why can't FEMA keep stocks of water on hand?

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