GOOD

In Oakland, That Surveillance Van Might Actually Be Part of an Interactive Art Exhibit

“Eye On Oakland” take the conversation about police surveillance out in public and onto the roads

image via (cc) flickr user pollas

For a while it seemed like every crime movie, whether a drama, comedy, or something awkwardly in-between, would feature a scene in which a team of over-worked cops would cram into the back of an unmarked surveillance van, packed with cameras, microphones, and someone telling everyone else to shush while holding a big pair of headphones up to one ear. It’s a cliché in a post-Edward Snowden world, an outdated one as well, but it’s an image which has nonetheless left a lasting impression on what people think of when they think of law enforcement surveillance. Admit it, you’ve probably walked past a nondescript van parked outside an equally nondescript storefront, and wondered–if only for a split second–whether you’d stumbled across a top-secret stakeout.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Celebrate Passover With the Forbidden Designer Challah Bag of Temptation

It may be the “breadless” holiday, but you can still gaze at these faux-designer carb-themed bags.

Ain’t No Challah Back (pack) Girl – Prada, 2015
13″ × 7″ / oil paint, urethane, and hardware

Just in time for the holy holiday of forbidden carbs, why not get together with a loved one and covet a highly-attractive, highly-verboten challah bag? Canadian-American painter and sculptor Chloe Wise, known for her inventive takes on the themes of consumerism and mass production, recently created a series of “bread bags”—cheeky homages to disposable luxury and conspicuous consumption in modern society. Wise has cleverly created this faux-line of purses, totes, and backpacks to mimic actual wares by some of fashion’s biggest names, including Prada, Chanel, and Louis Vuitton. In Wise’s world, a dangling lox bagel becomes a coin purse, a PBJ sandwich is a pricey patchwork tote, and an English muffin transforms into a tasty handbag. Created from ordinary breads, the artist casts the forms in urethane before employing a hyperrealist, trompe l’oeil effect—painting the exteriors to create the illusion of fresh baked pastry. Below, check out some of our favorites from her 2015 Bread Bags collection.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Artist Mariko Mori Uncovers Parallel Universes With New Show

One of the biggest art stars in Japan brings her intergalactic sculptures to NYC’s Sean Kelly Gallery.

Photograph by David Sims. Courtesy of Sean Kelly Gallery.

Though you might not have heard her name, in her home country of Japan 48-year-old polyglot artist Mariko Mori is a superstar. Her pieces, spanning from video, to film, to sculpture, seem like missives from the future, juxtaposing a Sci-Fi sleekness with a deep humanity that in some works, like her Rebirth series, can border on animism. Since her formal introduction to the western art world two decades ago, Mori has shown at the Brooklyn Museum, the MCA Chicago, and the Serpentine Gallery (among many others), and is now currently exhibiting at the Sean Kelly Gallery in NYC. The exhibit, Cyclicscape, which we had the pleasure of walking through with Mori late last week, is a stunning paean to humanity’s intrinsic ties with nature, modern spirituality, and the ways the environment and technology dance through our lives.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Art in the Trenches

A contemporary artist introduces viewers to soldiers’ wartime practice of turning artillery into artifacts

SAM DURANT, An Ingression of the Superstructure Into the Base, 2014. Found objects, light bulbs, plaster, wood, marble, steel, wood, MDF, acrylic, gauche, (fabrication Chris Dyson) overall 65.5 x 56.5 x 57 in. (166.4 x 143.5 x 144.8 cm). ©Sam Durant. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. Photo: Steven Probert.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How Artists Got a Flock of Extinct Birds to Invade a Museum

"Eclipse," now showing at MASS MoCA, commemorates the centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon.

Sayler/Morris and Elizabeth Kolbert, Eclipse (2014). Video Projection, 7:03. Courtesy the artists and Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

At one time, there were more passenger pigeons than people. A lot more. And they hung out together. In fact, it’s been said that there was a flock of passenger pigeons in Ontario in 1866 that may have boasted 3.5 billion birds—nearly thrice the world population at the time. The birds would turn the sky into an organic mass of transitory nocturne. Soon though, they were gone, killed off by habitat destruction and hunting (the birds were given to slaves for food) by mechanized bird-plucker. A single feathered friend by the name of Martha—the last passenger pigeon—expired 100 years ago come September.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles