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Big Data’s “Paranoid Pop Music” Debut Album

The band’s catchy songs look at the complicated relationship between people and technology

Alan Wilkis, via Twitter

Big data, the concept of both unstructured and structured data used by companies, has been around since about 2001. However, a new musician and producer of the same name is looking to challenge his namesake. Alan Wilkis, who goes by the stage name Big Data, is releasing his debut album, 2.0, in late March, which examines the complicated, tenuous relationship between people and technology.

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Google’s Big Data Overfishing Project Flounders

Though the anemic system may only locate the most inept or accidental fishery abusers, it’s still a step in the right direction.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Last month at the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s World Parks Congress in Sydney, Australia, Google unveiled a project it bills as a groundbreaking leap in the use of cloud computing, big data, and satellite networks—all to stamp out overfishing. The program, Global Fishing Watch, launched in beta with the help of environmental outfits Oceana and SkyTruth, uses the signals from Automatic Identification Systems (emergency devices installed in all major ships) to plot the trajectory of every commercial fishing vessel on the ocean. If they can raise $3 to $5 million to launch a public program, Google hopes that this visualized, real-time data will empower citizens to monitor and track ships, reporting those working in protected waters or outside of their supposed zones of operation to authorities.

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This content is brought to you by IBM

Women who hold a degree in science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) are less likely than their male counterparts to work in a STEM occupation. There are many theories, such as lack of role models and family flexibility, however, in 2011 women held less than 25 percent of STEM jobs in the U.S.

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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSCX78-8-q0&feature=youtu.be

This content is brought to you by IBM. GOOD and IBM have teamed up to bring you the Figures of Progress series to explore the different ways that information has revolutionized our world. Click here to read more stories.

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Nutrition and big data are two trendy topics we're bound to hear more and more about as 2013 unfolds. And Food Essentials, a Missouri-based company building a food label database, is tackling the intersection of the two.
Food Essentials is scanning and collecting the muddled wealth of information on the labels on food products—that means fat and sugar content, number of calories, and also ingredients, allergens and vitamins. They're doing this by crowdsourcing photographs of hundreds of labels in grocery stores around the country.
The result is a database of information larger than any currently existing, organized into an API (application programming interface) that can be accessed by developers and used to build mobile apps that help empower consumers to make healthy—or at the least, informed—choices about their food products.
Food Essentials also helps organize and categorize the information, assigning labels like “low sodium” to products relative to the type of food. In other words, a certain brand of cashew may be low in sodium compared to the other packaged nuts in its category, but would not be considered a low sodium food when compared to frozen vegetables.
According to the CEO, Anton Xavier, “Our mission is to make vast amounts of food label data accessible to brands, developers as well as government entities, while keeping it simple to analyze.”
Have at it developers. I’d use an app for that.

This month, we're challenging the GOOD community to host a dinner party and cook a meal that contains fewer ingredients than the number of people on the guest list. Throughout March, we'll share ideas and resources for being more conscious about our food and food systems. Join the conversation at good.is/food and on Twitter at #chewonit.

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