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Drilling Deeper Into BP's Sustainability Review

The graph that BP's Sustainability Review leaves out, and what else is missing from the oil company's report.

This morning Cord posted a startling chart about BP's oil spill accounting in their latest Sustainability Review. The chart shows BP's "volume of oil spilled" in 2006, 2008, and 2010, and was pretty infuriating as it didn't include numbers from the Gulf oil spill. Which, obviously, changes things.

Here are the numbers that the graph was culled from:

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BP Refuses to Account for Gulf Leak in 2010 Sustainability Report

The company doesn't count the Deepwater Horizon spill because there's "no accurate determination" of how many gallons leaked.


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Oil Spill Art That is Made from BP Oil

A money-raising art project is using oil collected from the BP oil spill to create posters that will help fund the relief.


Happiness Brussels has put together an art project to raise money for (and awareness about) about the oil spill relief, with limited-edition posters bearing the simple but strong message "Oil & Water Do Not Mix." The hook? They are using oil from the oil spill in the Gulf for the prints. They sell for 150 pounds apiece, with all proceeds going to the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana.

Here is what the oil looks like:

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There's an interesting story over at CNN.com, which discusses the degree of difficulty in President Barack Obama's speech to the country on Tuesday evening. Linguists are apparently arguing over whether the content of the address, which concerned the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, was too complex for viewers at home.

According to Paul J.J. Payack, president of Global Language Monitor, Obama's speech, which he graded a "B," catered to elites. Payack says it was written at nearly a 10th grade reading-level, as opposed to the addresses Obama typically give, which typically fall between grade seven to eight. He also noted that the sentences he used were particularly dense, including ones that stretched nearly 20 words long.

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