GOOD

Policeman's Best Friend: 5 Famous Dogs With Badges

Meet the 5 most adorable pups that have put themselves in the line of fire.

Dogs have long been used around the world to help police officers protect the peace. Whether a manhunt, a search for a missing person, drugs, bombs, or a response to full scale tragedy, K9 units are now so much a part of the police force, that in the U.S., many dog have their own police badges and IDs. Several different breeds of pups are regularly used in police operations—the most common being German Shepherds and Belgian Malinois. Beagles are often brought to airports for missions like sniffing for explosives; Bloodhounds are know to find everything from cadavers, bombs, and drugs; and the Bernese Mountain Dog is good at locating missing people.

One of the first real attempts to use dogs to help solve a crime and apprehend a criminal was in 1888 when two Bloodhounds were given simple tracking test set by the Metropolitan (London) Police, to help the with the hunt for Jack the Ripper. It didn't go as planned, with one of the hounds biting the Commissioner and both dogs later running off, requiring a police search to find them, but it paved the way for the future of canine cops. Here's a roundup of five of the most famous hounds in police history. Know any pawed police that should be on this list?

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Call Your Grandmother, If You Still Remember Her Number

Whose phone numbers do you have memorized?

At this point in my life, being dependent on a cell phone for over a decade, and a smartphone for almost as long, there are very few numbers that I remember. Three to be exact: My best friend, my brother, and my grandmother. The latter because she's had the same landline number for as many years as I'm old. And you know why that's a great thing? Because that means in any scenario, anywhere in the world, I'll always be able to call her to check in, and make sure she's doing okay. That means as much to me as it does to her.

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Clear as a Bell: Video of the First Cell Phone Call

From a car in the parking lot of Soldier Field in Chicago, the first cell phone call was made in 1983.

Do you remember a time when people existed without cell phones? When you'd actually leave a message on a home answering machine? Me neither, but back in 1983 the idea of the kind of connected world we live in now, with one hand constantly on our mobiles seemed improbable. That was the year that Bob Barnett, who served as president of the regional telecom Ameritech, made the first commercial cell phone call, to none other than Alexander Graham Bell's grandson. Sitting in a car in the parking lot of Soldier Field in Chicago, Barnett called Germany as the world watched—turns out the connection was crystal clear.

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Hospital Bills Ain't Gangsta: Four Reasons We Need Students to Start a ‘Food Fight'

If we care about our kids, ourselves, and our planet, it's time to expose the truth about food through hip hop and education.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mu8QthlZ6hY&list=HL1363757763

As a green jobs and food justice organizer, a hip-hop performer and climate educator in high schools—and a witness to my grandmother passing away from diabetes when I was just an young boy—I know food and nutrition are a nexus point connecting climate change, food security, obesity, hunger, and poverty. Food can lead to economic development, particularly in communities of color, and healing in a world increasingly inundated with chemicals, nutritionally deficient food products, and environmental degradation.

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Want Low Income Kids Ready for the Global Workforce? Teach Them a Second Language

We have to make sure all children reap the benefits afforded by an increasingly globalized economy.


The low percentage of passport holders in America is always a conversation among the intelligentsia. Passports, they proclaim, are critical to knowing and seeing the world around us. I couldn't agree more. After reading statistics about the low percentage of minority students who studied abroad I made it my personal mission to encourage more students to travel and to learn world languages.

With this mission in mind in 2009 I founded Global Language Project, an educational nonprofit that works with underserved elementary schools to launch language and culture programs. We currently serve over 800 New York City students teaching Mandarin, Arabic and Spanish.

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What would you do if your city announced it would close 19 out of 25 local libraries? Protest, complain, become a cynic, or take action and create something new? A group of residents from Rotterdam chose the latter when we learned that our libraries would be closing by the end of 2012.

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