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Politics on Wheels: Critiquing Campaign Buses

Like any design element of a political campaign, a candidate’s bus is important for how it represents the candidate himself.


The return of campaign season means the buses are back, as presidential hopefuls ditch their blazers and roll up their shirtsleeves to partake in the decades-old tradition of campaigning on the road. Most years, the buses themselves don’t get much attention—they’re simply the vehicles for their candidates’ messages. But that all changed last week, when Senator John McCain dissed the President's campaign bus on the Senate floor.

On a three-day road trip through Virginia and North Carolina to promote his American Jobs Act, President Obama traversed the countryside in Ground Force One, a sleek black motorcoach loaded with more technology than an Apple store. McCain took offense to the bus’s origin—the vehicle’s shell and chassis was purchased from a Canadian manufacturer and customized in Nashville—but he also critiqued its visual appeal.

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Will You Pledge to Create One New Job? One Job for America Asks You to Pledge to Hire One Person

The One Job for America campaign is asking all businesses to hire one new person, and spread the word. Will you help?


Certainly, not everyone is in a position hire someone right now, but is unemployment the kind of problem we can tackle if we all chip in? Or at least, if all businesses chip in? That's the ambitious hope of the One Job for America campaign.

The brutally simple website declares: "Imagine what could happen if every business in America, large and small, created one new job..." and calls on every business owner to "Take a pledge today and promise that you'll hire at least one new person. Then tell a friend to do the same. Together, we will bring back jobs in America one by one."

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