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Video: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Dirty Money Influence, Told in Graffiti

Watch this time lapse graffiti video taking down the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and get pumped for Power Shift.


Our friends at 350.org (or should I say, the new 350.org?) released a great new video this morning for their "The U.S. Chamber Doesn't Speak for Me" campaign, which we at GOOD are partners on.

[vimeo][/vimeo]

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Everything That's Wrong About the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in One Infographic

Learn how the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is nothing but a front group for big polluters in under 30 seconds.

If you don't know already, GOOD is partnering with 350.org on the "The U.S. Chamber Doesn't Speak for Me" campaign. (See our initial announcement post, or all our Chamber coverage.) The basic message is simple: when it comes to climate and energy, the US Chamber of Commerce represents the interests of big polluters, not everyday American business.

A local organizer told the command center at 350.org that they needed a good, "simple way to explain the whole campaign in 30 seconds or less." So they created this amazing graphic below, chock full of need-to-know facts and figures about the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's nefarious ways.

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Money Pollution: The Chamber of Commerce Darkens the Skies

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is a front for the biggest corporations and polluters. Small businesses are saying "the chamber doesn't speak for me."


In Beijing, they celebrate when they have a “blue sky day,” when, that is, the haze clears long enough so that you can actually see the sun. Many days, you can’t even make out the next block.

Washington, by contrast, looks pretty clean: white marble monuments; broad, tree-lined avenues; the beautiful, green spread of the Mall. But its inhabitants—at least those who vote in Congress—can’t see any more clearly than the smoke-shrouded residents of Beijing.

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Chamber of Commerce Want Kids to Worry About Energy Regulations

Staunch opponents of the government protecting the public create an energy guide to scare kids about the dangers of regulation.


The Chamber of Commerce (long an loud opponent of any rules to protect the public) wants to scare kids about energy regulation. In a "teaching guide" that will go out to roughly 100,000 classrooms, thanks to their witless partners at Scholastic, they suggest this discussion question:

What do you think could happen if one of our energy sources were suddenly unavailable (e.g., power plant maintenance, government curb on production, etc.)?

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