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How Americans Spend Their Money, Organized By Class

Ever wonder how your fellow citizens in adjacent (or distant) income brackets live?

Ever wonder how your fellow citizens in adjacent (or distant) income brackets live? The sharp folks over at NPR's Planet Money assembled this handy chart to give us a glimpse inside the budgets of American households, organized by income group.

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Young Activists Care About Race, Gender, and the Economy—But Not the Election

A new report reveals Millennials want social change, but don't believe the election can make it happen.



A new report from the Applied Research Center concludes that young progressive activists care about racial justice, class divides, and gender issues. They're worried about widespread ignorance, complacency, and the danger of unchecked capitalism. They also don't have much faith in Obama—or much use for the upcoming election.

The report was compiled using information from several focus groups of progressive activists in Portland, Oakland, Atlanta, Baltimore, and New York. The ARC chose participants (about half of them white, half people of color) with "experience as a paid employee, volunteer, or small donor of a social justice or community organization," or who had participated in the Occupy movement.

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Heavy Lifting: Why I Chose Manual Labor Over Making Lattes

In the new gig economy, people of all classes and education levels are doing hard physical work.


In our weekly Hustlin' series, we go beyond the pitying articles about recession-era youth and illuminate ways our generation is coping. The last few years may have been a rude awakening, but we're surviving. Here's how.

When I moved to Toronto three years ago, I took a job an hour away in a suburban industrial park. In the warehouse, a former Coleman stove factory, technicians designed and assembled complex lighting and audio rigs for massive stadium shows (Nickelback, Bono, the Dalai Lama). My job was to load those rigs into trucks. I would wake before dawn and arrive at the warehouse to a rush packing job. If we forgot gloves while packing crates on a winter morning, the skin of our hands would stick to the frozen metal edges and rip. If I slacked, the weight of whatever we were lifting into the truck just came down on someone else. "Fucking push," we encouraged each other.

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Mapping the Connection Between Poverty and Rioting

A visualization of London's class inequality helps ask important questions about what sparked that city's riots.


Sign seen at a March 2011 anti-austerity rally in London.

The riots that wreaked havoc across London this week are over, and Prime Minister David Cameron has promised swift justice for their participants (police say more than 1,200 people have been arrested since the madness began). Now it's up to sociologists and political pundits to speculate about why the riots happened and how to prevent them from happening again.

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Dietary Supplements: Ball Jars and Medicinal Beer

Burnt coffee, medicinal beer, and Ball jars are on the menu in today's daily roundup of what we're reading at GOOD Food HQ. Enjoy!


The key to better cafeterias? The author of Mindless Eating makes the case for school lunch with a side of behavioral psychology.

Lay off the burnt coffee. Tasting bitter drinks has been linked to harsher, more judgemental behavior—and apparently affects conservatives more than liberals.

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If Height Matched Income, American Rich Would Be Two Miles Tall

If height and income were proportional, the average American would be waist high. The rich would be two miles tall. The poor? Nearly invisible.


Dovetailing off Cord's recent thoughts on American inequality (and inequity), The Economist presents a powerful way of imagining the gap between rich and poor in the United States:

Jan Pen, a Dutch economist who died last year, came up with a striking way to picture inequality. Imagine people’s height being proportional to their income, so that someone with an average income is of average height. Now imagine that the entire adult population of America is walking past you in a single hour, in ascending order of income.

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