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A New Weapon in Colombia’s War on Drugs: Cocaine-Eating Moths

Coca-hungry moth larvae could soon replace toxic sprayed herbicides.

Banded tussock moth. Image by Rhododendrites via Wikimedia Commons

The government of Colombia is trying to recruit cocaine’s biggest fan—no, not Rick James—to help them finally clear the country of the illegally grown drug. The favorite food of the Cocaine Tussock Moth larva is, as its name implies, the leaves of the coca plant. Alberto Gomez, head of the Quindio Botanical Garden, (a Colombian preserve with a building shaped like a giant butterfly), has suggested a plan to flood the country with a horde of the hungry little insects as an alternative to spraying pesticides.

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Raising Up Through Hip-Hop

Nas-produced documentary Shake The Dust follows b-boys and crews from Yemen to Uganda, showcasing the resilient spirit of hip-hop.

Shake the Dust premieres on Vimeo today. Special thanks to Bond/360 for images

https://vimeo.com/ondemand/shakethedust/124553461[/vimeo]

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Colombia’s Violent Past Presented as Stunning Works of Art

This week, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago celebrates the work of conceptual sculptor Doris Salcedo with her first ever retrospective.

Doris Salcedo Installation view, Doris Salcedo Studio, Bogotá, 2013 Photo- Oscar Monsalve Pino Reproduced courtesy of the artist; Alexander and Bonin, New York; and White Cube, London

Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo has the unique talent of being able to turn something innocuous, like a draped sheet or an empty bed, into a meaningful statement on the human condition. This week, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago celebrates the work of this singular artist with her first ever retrospective, which will include not just her greatest hits but also some of her more obscure treasures.

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Lumni: Investing in College Students as If They Were Companies

Social enterprise Lumni makes paying for college a collective investment instead of an individual one.

With the cost of higher education spiraling ever upwards, creative ideas for footing tuition bills are more important than ever. But what if paying for college became a collective investment instead of an individual one? That's the thinking behind Lumni, a 9-year-old social enterprise that helps finance the cost of college for students in exchange for a fixed percentage of their future earnings over a set period of time.

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Moving South

If L.A. wants to improve its transportation, it should look south of the border - and get on the bus.

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