GOOD

Five Ways To Use 300 More Instructional Hours In A Year

There are other ways to use the extra time other than test prep.


On Monday I woke up to the news that a pilot program starting in a few states, including Connecticut and New York, would add 300 more instructional hours to the school year starting in 2013. I don't know about you, but I have yet to see a real study showing a positive correlation between classroom time (teacher-student face-to-face for a designated class) and student achievement. If you're not as informed with the research, your natural inclination is to say "Yes! More schooling sounds great." What it usually means, however, is that those 300 hours get used for test prep and, well, more test prep.

No recess, no extracurriculars, no special electives.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How to Break the Cycle of Remedial College Classes

At least a third of college students start freshman year in remedial classes. A California project shows that it doesn't have to be that way.


This month, more than half of community college freshmen and at least a third of university students started college already behind. They're in at least one remedial course that does not count toward a degree, thus beginning at least four months—and sometimes years—delayed in getting the degree they enrolled to earn.

This colossal disappointment is largely avoidable. Students need not toil in remedial courses that cost precious time and money.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The Five Best Projects from the Gates Foundation's Education Technology Competition

Here are our five favorite projects from the Gates Foundation's education technology grant competition.

On Tuesday the Gates Foundation announced 19 winners of the second phase of its Next Generation Learning Challenges grant competition. The NGLC's priority is using technology to improve college readiness among low-income students, and what makes these new grantees noteworthy is that they're working on targeting the critical seventh- through ninth-grade years—well before students can either drop out or fall too far behind in higher level math and science. Each project is also aligned with the new Common Core Standards, which are all about developing higher-order thinking skills. While all 19 grantees are noteworthy, here are five that really stand out:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Over at The Washington Post's Answer Sheet blog, guest blogger and University of Virginia cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham unfurled, over the course of three weeks and three meaty posts, a proposal for how we might ascertain if the Common Core Standards, which have been adopted by 33 states, are improving student outcomes in the future.

In order to do so, he had to confront one truth about education policy:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The College Board is among those people and institutions flummoxed by the U.S.'s dip to number 12 on the list of countries with the highest percentage of their populations holding college degrees.

This weekend, on The Huffington Post, Gaston Caperton, The College Board's president outlined his organization's plan for helping to get 55 percent of Americans to be degree-holders by 2025. (The current percentage stands at about 40 percent.)

Keep Reading Show less
Articles