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Sweet! Science Identifies the “Sugar Craving” Circuit in Our Brains

Now that we’ve identified it, can we use it to help us eat better?

image via (cc) flickr user tjadin

A new study done by researchers out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s has, for the first time, identified the existence of a specific neural pathway in the brain which regulates compulsive sugar cravings independent of the body's other appetite-related processes. That's good news for anyone who finds themselves the owner of a seriously unhealthy sweet tooth—an independent neural circuit responsible for extreme sugar cravings has the potential to be treated without interfering with the body's natural appetite for other (hopefully healthier) foods.

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Watch Your Mouth: Eat Lightly and Carry a Big Fork How Big Forks and Heavy Bowls Help You Eat Less

Bigger forks and heavier bowls might sound supersized, but they could actually cut down on portion sizes.

Between the opening nights of All About Eve and Mean Girls, an average moviegoer’s portion of popcorn increased sevenfold. Starbucks' gut-busting Trenta is more than double the size of its original tall paper cup. The surface area of an average dinner plate is as much as 36 percent larger than it was in 1960. Even some recipes in the most recent edition of The Joy of Cooking, the staple of middle-class kitchens everywhere, expanded 42 percent from their 1931 versions.

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Eating While Black: How I Navigate Watermelon, Fried Chicken, and Frozen Yogurt

I can’t help but have my race in the back of my mind when I’m ordering.

I always hope no one catches me.

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Is the "Tongue Patch" the Dumbest Diet Fad Ever?

The tongue patch isn't just stupid, costly, and dangerous, it also doesn't work. It might be the worst weight-loss scheme ever.

Yes. Yes, it is.

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