GOOD

Bans on plastic bags and straws can only go so far. Using disposable products, like grabbing a plastic fork when you're on the go, can be incredibly convenient. But these items also contribute to our growing plastic problem.

Fortunately, you can cut down on the amount of waste you produce by cutting down on disposable products. And even more fortunately, there are sustainable (and cute) replacements that won't damage the environment.

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The Planet
via Frank Schwichtenberg / Wikimedia Commons

Swiss auto manufacturer Rinspeed has a released a new concept car called the Oasis that's jam-packed with every feature you could possibly want — plus some you didn't even know you needed — including a garden beneath the hood.

Most importantly, it provides the industry with a glimpse into the future of transportation. The car is great for the environment, has incredible safety features, and can senselessly integrate into its passenger's lifestyle via artificial intelligence.

The Oasis is an electric car designed for personal ownership or as a self-driving, ride-sharing vehicle. Its hatchback design is almost completely see-through and it has a 5K display screen.

In the future, when everything is self-driving, the Oasis' steering wheel can be turned into a table, so you can start work early on your morning commute. It has a top speed of 80 miles per hour and solar panels are integrated into the roof design.

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Innovators

World’s Largest Indoor Vertical Garden Comes to the Garden State

The AeroFarms facility is bringing millions of pounds of leafy greens, and dozens of green jobs, to Newark.

AerFarms anticipated corporate HQ.

The tri-state area may be in the middle of what some in the Yiddish speaking community call a “massive shvitz” (learn the word, it will come in handy), but that isn’t stopping Newark mayor Ras J. Baraka from going out and getting down and dirty with nature. Tomorrow Baraka, along with acting governor Guadagno, will break ground for the world’s largest indoor vertical farm at the AeroFarms Headquarters at 212 Rome Street.

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Articles

Duke and UNC Adopt Caps and Gowns Made Out of Recycled Plastic Bottles

Good news: A new fabric called GreenWeaver, spun from molten plastic pellets, is being used for the graduation gear by a growing list of schools.


Need another good reason to recycle your plastic bottles? They might end up as part of someone's graduation cap and gown outfit. The Virginia-based company Oak Hall Cap & Gown has long produced graduation gear, but in 2008, after realizing that schools are trying to become more environmentally responsible, it began developing a fabric called GreenWeaver that's spun from molten plastic pellets. Each gown uses an average of 23 post-consumer plastic bottles—even the bags the gowns come in are made out of recycled plastic.

According to GreenWeaver's Facebook page, five percent of colleges currently purchase the environmentally conscious caps and gowns. That translates into "310,000 graduates who have worn GreenWeaver resulting in 7,130,000 plastic bottles being removed from landfills."

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Articles