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This Adorable Panda Daycare Seeks to Save Endangered Species

There are less than 2,000 giant pandas in the world. A daycare seeks to bring this dying species back to life.

Image via panda.org.cn

To say that pandas are cute is to say nothing at all. Next to cats and dogs with neck problems, they’re one of the most posted about animals on the internet. But they’re also deeply endangered, with about 1,826 left in the wild. That’s why the Chengdu Research Base in China decided to come up with their very own giant panda daycare, seeking to breed, nurture, and release pandas into the wild. The base hopes to slowly re-populate a rapidly diminishing species.

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Cat Scrunchies Could Save Endangered Australian Wildlife

An ‘80s fashion accessory is making a comeback with Down Under conservationists.

Photo by Rocky Mountain Feline Rescue via Flickr

A new study says that the scrunchie, a historical, late 20th-century hair accessory, might be the answer to one of the biggest dangers facing Australia’s local wildlife. ABC Australia reports that collaring cats with the frilled, brightly colored bands keeps prowling felines from killing the nation’s threatened birds and lizards, many of which are not found anywhere else in the world.

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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDYqZncKNNc

We're sorry to report that this past Monday Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island giant tortoise, passed away at his Galápagos Islands habitat. George was more than 100 years old—which, believe it or not, is relatively young for a giant tortoise—and it’s still not clear why he died. Check out the above footage, via The Associated Press.

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Unicorn Lookalikes Make a Comeback

The Arabian oryx, which inspired early unicorn myths, made a remarkable recovery from extinction.

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Lisa Frank fans, rejoice! The Arabian oryx, the species that may have inspired the original unicorn legends (and millions of psychedelic stickers), teetered on the edge of extinction less than 40 years ago. But just yesterday, the International Union for Conservation of Nature announced that the oryx's threat level would be lowered from "endangered" to "vulnerable" species.
According to the IUCN's latest Red List, an annual update on the health of at-risk species, the Arabian oryx is a true conservation success story. The oryx, which once thrived throughout the Arabian peninsula's most arid lands, was classified "Extinct in the Wild" by the IUCN in the 1970s, and in the 1980s efforts began to breed the oryx in captivity and reintroduce the creature throughout Oman, Saudi Arabia, and other countries in the region. A recent survey counts the species at 1,000 strong, a promising figure given its close call with extinction.

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