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Can Rockstar-Turned-Environmentalist Benjamin Bronfman Make Caring About CO2 Emissions Cool?

At just 32, Bronfman has run an eco-friendly clothing line and even produced some of Kanye’s greatest hits. Now he’s shifting his focus towards the world of carbon capture technology.

Bronfman hopes to appeal to a new generation of eco-entrepreneurs.

Musician and entrepreneur Benjamin Bronfman has packed an enormous amount into his 32 years. By the time he left Emerson College in the early 2000s he was already a part of a successful indie band, The Exit, and had created the groundwork for his musical collective, Teachers, the group that would ultimately produce Kanye West’s smash-hits ‘Monster’ and ‘New Slaves’. Bronfman has also been married once, to controversial multi-genre rapper MIA, with whom he has a child, Ikhyd, and previously ran an eco-friendly record label and clothing line, Green Owl, with his younger sister Hannah. We should also note, as it often is, that Bronfman is the son of Edgar Bronfman, Jr., former CEO of Warner Music Group, heir to the Seagram’s empire, and that he also comes from one of North America’s wealthiest and most influential families. The side of Bronfman that few know, far from the glamour of Page 6 or Rolling Stone, is his humanitarian bent. Since 2007, he has been working behind the scenes at carbon-negative technology start-up Global Thermostat, selected as one of “The World’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies of 2015 in Energy” by Fast Company. Bronfman and his team hope to convince brands and organizations, as well as entire governments, to adapt their innovative CO2 filtering technology, which has shown promise for stymieing the devastating effects of global warming.

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New Website to Put the Joy Back Into Our Purchases

Wooly wants to be the Sotheby’s for a new generation--while quietly taking part in the sustainability revolution.

Wooly's first offering.

Rudy Adler, a long-time friend of GOOD, formed Wooly to create an alternative to rampant mass-consumerism.

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Diving Into the Deep End: Enstitute's Apprentices Learn by Doing

Enstitute's apprenticeship program is transforming the way millennials think of higher education.

“In K-12, we’ve identified many different ways with which young kids learn,” says Shaila Ittycheria. “But somehow, when everyone turns 18, we say OK, college is the one pathway.” Ittycheria is the cofounder of Enstitute, an apprenticeship program that matches young go-getters with high-powered mentors. Apprentices, who range in age from 18-24, are thrown directly into the deep end of the professional pool, suddenly immersed in the culture and real-life responsibilities of the working world.

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