GOOD

Watch Your Mouth: When to Taste—or Toss—Your Leftovers

Federal officials warn you to toss food that's been unrefrigerated for more than four hours. The advice stems from a broth full of Listeria.

Your fridge is off. Your lights are out. Chances are you’re not reading this.

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The Raffi of Food Allergies: Inside the Allergic-Kid Economy

Kyle Dine sings songs for kids who hate nuts. And as more and more American kids develop food allergies, his fan base is only getting bigger.



As a kid, Kyle Dine was introduced to a long menu of foods he wasn’t allowed to eat: tree nuts, peanuts, eggs, turmeric, mustard, shellfish, salmon. But Dine was determined not to let his food allergies get in his way. That didn’t always turn out so well: He took risks and didn’t read labels. When he was 21, a relative handed him a dessert square and told him it was egg-free. Within two minutes, Dine felt his throat closing up—the dessert contained cashews. He alerted his mother, who injected him with his EpiPen and called 911. He spent the night swollen in the hospital, hooked up to an IV that pumped his body full of antihistamines.

“It was a very close call,” Dine says. “It was definitely a very shocking experience for me.” Today, Dine has reinvented himself as the Raffi of food allergies. A couple years after his dessert square scare, Dine was teaching guitar at an Ontario summer camp when he met a group of kids who all happened to be allergic to peanuts. The group broke into an ad lib song with the refrain, “We Hate Nuts!” Dine now performs a version of that song—and other allergy-themed ditties, like “My Epineph Friend” and “Food Allergies Rock”—for groups of children from Toronto to Texas.

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The 'Wacky' USDA Ad Campaign to Get You to Separate Your Meat and Veggies

Three thousand people are likely to die from food poisoning this year. But will this naughty chicken be able to do anything about it?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yeVdiATCGY

This summer, the United States Department of Agriculture would like you to play it safe. The message: Keep that raw meat away from your fresh veggies. To spread the word, the agency has created a series of friendly video reminders. The stars: a chicken that acts like a dog, a pig talking it up in a sauna, and a lobster chilling on the couch.

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Feast Your Eyes: Radioactive Wasabi

Japanese authorities update the list of contaminated foods while the FDA tests produce at U.S. ports.


As contaminated water leaks into the ocean from the the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, and the soil near the plant tests positive for plutonium, Japanese authorities have updated the list of the nation's contaminated foods.

Milk, spinach, and other leafy greens grown in Miyagi and neighboring prefectures were already known to contain elevated levels of radioactive iodine-131 and cesium-137, but now 99 more products have tested positive for radioactive contamination—although most still at levels considered safe to eat for everyone but infants and pregnant women.

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Winning the Future with Salmon

That line that got the most laughs during Obama's State of the Union actually raises an important issue about our broken food regulatory system.


Immediately after President Obama finished his State of the Union address last night, NPR asked listeners to summarize his speech in three words. In the word cloud they generated from the 4,000 responses received (below), the word "salmon" looms rather large—larger than "jobs," much larger than "innovation," and much, much larger than "Sputnik."

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