GOOD


With the passing of the Agricultural Act of 2014, I feel it especially important to share my personal story of food insecurity. After long and painful negotiations over our nation’s agricultural and nutrition safety net programs, the Agricultural Act of 2014 has finally passed. Unfortunately, the bill included $8 billion in cuts over the next 10 years to SNAP (formerly Food Stamps). This means that 850,000 low-income households will receive fewer benefits to help them keep food on the table.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Cory Booker, Taking 'Food Stamp' Challenge, Finds Early Hurdles

He says he's already found difficulties, including going without some items he's accustomed to, like caffeine, and that he has to plan carefully.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIFPuS4D9Qk

Newark Mayor Cory Booker has taken the challenge to live on the same food budget available to those in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program—the equivalent of $4.32 per day. He says he's already found difficulties, including going without some items he's accustomed to, like caffeine, and finding that if he doesn't plan very carefully, he's without food for long stretches of time during the day.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Watch Your Mouth: What Should Food Stamps Subsidize? Should Food Stamps Pay For Junk Food?

The federal food stamp program is about alleviating poverty, not discouraging obesity, so farmers' markets or fatty snacks are both fair game.


Correction appended

In the spring of 1961, Alderson Muncy, a miner from West Virginia, traveled 22 miles to a grocery store where the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture awaited his arrival with a television crew and $95 in food stamps. The food allowance would need to cover meals for the jobless man, his wife, and their 13 children for a month. As Muncy loaded up his Jeep for the trip home, The New York Times reported that he had a shopping cart full of groceries “prominently including vanilla wafers and two boxes of cake mix.”

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Nearly 50 Million Americans Have Difficulty Obtaining Food

New USDA research reveals the huge number of people struggling to eat, the reason our welfare programs are so necessary right now.


Fresh on the heels of a study that showed 15 percent of Americans use food stamps, a new USDA survey has found that more than 17 million U.S. households (PDF) had at least some trouble putting food on the table in 2010. Those 17 million homes account for nearly 50 million people, or more than 16 percent of the American population. Of the millions of households struggling to get enough to eat, almost 60 percent relied on one or more of the nation's three largest nutritional assistance programs: food stamps, the National School Lunch Program, or the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children.

These numbers make conservatives' attempts to cut nutrition benefits for America's neediest all the more worrisome, and, in some cases, offensive. South Carolina's Republican Lieutenant Governor Andre Bauer last year compared people receiving food benefits to "stray animals" that "don't know any better": "My grandmother was not a highly educated woman, but she told me as a small child to quit feeding stray animals," he said "They will reproduce, especially ones that don’t think too much further than that. And so what you’ve got to do is you’ve got to curtail that type of behavior. They don’t know any better."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Food Stamp Use at NYC Greenmarkets Doubled Last Year

Over the past couple of years, New York's City Council has spent $1.3 billion equipping farmers' markets with machines that can process food...

Over the past couple of years, New York's City Council has spent $1.3 million equipping farmers' markets with machines that can process food stamps. New data seems to show that investment paying off, as today's New York Daily News reports:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles