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If you're surprised to learn that five dollars will buy you just one beer in Japan, but 12 beers in China, you'll enjoy this cool little video from Buzzfeed. It gives us a slight—though quite entertaining—sneak peek into the global food system, by painting a picture of what five bucks (or the equivalent of five dollars, according to each country's currency) will buy in eggs, rice, beer, coffee, Big Macs, and more, in several nations around the world.

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Variations on a Table: Jeffrey Inaba Uses Salvaged Materials to Redesign Dinner

What happens when you limit your table designs to what can be built from reclaimed materials in local co-op workshops? (Hint: good things.)

In the Bay Area this weekend? Come along to Hayes Valley Farm between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm tomorrow (Sunday), to enjoy some organic Caffe Vita coffee and Theo chocolate, tour the farm, check out C-Lab's gorgeous table, and hear a few words from Ellen Gustafson. There's a Facebook invitation here, but no RSVP is necessary—Hayes Valley Farm is at 450 Laguna Street (at Fell), and all are welcome.

GOOD is proud to be a partner of the 30 Project: For more information about our goals and plans, see this introduction, "Have Dinner, Change the World" by 30 Project founder Ellen Gustafson, and "Tables to Change the World: An Interview with Michael Hebb."

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Food Studies: Meet Megan, Studying Food Systems at NYU

GOOD's fourth Food Studies blogger is Megan, who's learning about South Korea's kimchi crisis, restaurant wine lists, and the connection between them.

Food Studies features the voices of volunteer student bloggers from a variety of different food- and agriculture-related programs at universities around the world.

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Mapping Race, Gender, and Class in the Food Supply Chain

A new report details a shocking litany of injustices across the food chain, from pesticide poisonings to enormous wage gaps—and a silver lining.

On Wednesday, my colleague Cord posted the findings of a new report called "Behind the Kitchen Door," which detailed inequalities and abuses in the restaurant industry, including the fact that white restaurant workers make $4 an hour more than their minority counterparts.

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