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Charlie Hebdo Will No Longer Draw the Prophet Mohammed

The French satirical magazine reflects on comedy’s rights and responsibilities.

Image via Wikimedia

Earlier this year, 12 cartoonists from French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo were massacred in a brutal terrorist attack. Al-Qaeda from Yemen claimed responsibility for the assault, arguing that the paper had published blasphemous images of the Prophet Mohammed. A debate over free speech and the role of satire raged then died out, until yesterday, when Charlie Hebdo announced that they would no longer be drawing the Prophet Mohammed in cartoons. While some accused them of pandering, for others, the decision comes as a relief.

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When Australia and its island state Tasmania signed the Tasmanian Forests Intergovernmental Agreement in 2011, it seemed to offer a peaceful conclusion to the fight over the country's natural forests that had raged for decades. That agreement, which expanded the protected area of Tasmanian forests and provided resources for logging companies to develop alternative plantation-based pulp production, may be in danger if Tasmania's new state government gets its way.

Will Hodgman, whose term as the premier of Tasmania started at the end of March, announced plans this week to repeal the agreement and open up around 400,000 previously protected hectares of forest for the timber industry.

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A sixth-grader in Texas with the user name, "Gummy Bear," pops onto my laptop screen. She's doing a National History Day project about "rights and responsibilities" that highlights the Supreme Court case Tinker v. Des Moines that I was a plaintiff in.

She wants to know why I wore a black armband to school in eighth grade in 1965, and why the Court ruled on February 24, 1969, that neither students nor teachers "shed their Constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate."

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Judge Gives Philly Area Students the Right to "Heart" Boobies

Two students who got in trouble last October for wearing the "I (heart) Boobies! (Keep A Breast)" bracelets are vindicated by a federal judge.

Thanks to a federal judge, students at Easton Area Middle School can once again express their love of boobies. Two students, 12-year-old Kayla Martinez and 13-year-old Brianna Hawk, got in trouble last October 28, Breast Cancer Awareness Day, for wearing the ubiquitous, awareness raising "I (heart) Boobies! (Keep A Breast)" bracelets. School officials banned the bracelets at the start of the school year, alleging they were a sexual double entendre and could encourage harassment. The ACLU filed suit on behalf of the girls and their parents, saying the ban infringed on their free speech rights.

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UCLA Student's Anti-Asian YouTube Rant: Do Colleges Need Mandatory Diversity Classes?

UCLA junior Alexandra Wallace's anti Asian rant raises the question—should colleges teach how to work with people from diverse backgrounds?


A UCLA student is in hot water after filming a disturbing anti-Asian rant and posting it online. Last Friday, political science major Alexandra Wallace taped an almost three-minute video called "Asians in the Library," and over the weekend, it went viral on YouTube. In the video she attacks Asian students for everything from talking on their cell phones to having elderly relatives come visit. Although the university has condemned her tirade, the incident raises the question, what should colleges do foster a truly inclusive learning environment and prepare students for a diverse world?

Wallace complains about "these hordes of Asian people that UCLA accepts into our school every single year," and then bashes them for their so-called bad manners. She demonstrates her "good" American manners by insensitively criticizing Asian students who used the phone after the tsunami hit Japan saying, "I swear they're going through their whole families just checking on everybody from the tsunami thing."

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Internet Censorship

Sex. Ass. Falun gong. Chances are, if you're reading this right now, you don't live in Yemen, Myanmar, or China. Internet censorship can take many forms, from restricting private internet access to blocking searches for politically volatile keywords. Exercise your internet freedom by taking a look..

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPAvg6CU6sISex. Ass. Falun gong. Chances are, if you're reading this right now, you don't live in Yemen, Myanmar, or China. Internet censorship can take many forms, from restricting private internet access to blocking searches for politically volatile keywords. Exercise your internet freedom by taking a look at our latest Transparency.LEARN MOREReporters Without Borders; Open Net Initiative

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