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The best thing about social media is also the worst: These days everyone has a voice. Democracy is alive on the Internet but it's not always the same as making a statement. Before Twitter, millions of Americans shared their political and folksy wisdom through the analog power of the bumper sticker. Sure, sometimes those bumper stickers go a bit far or are in bad taste, but there's something delightful about the power of communicating pithy statements on the back of our cars.

The bumper sticker has had a bit of a comeback in the age of Trump and there is no shortage of pro and anti-Trump bumper stickers out there. That said, most of our favorite political bumper stickers are timeless in their deep and often snarky wisdom. Here are 12 of our favorites:

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Charlie Hebdo Will No Longer Draw the Prophet Mohammed

The French satirical magazine reflects on comedy’s rights and responsibilities.

Image via Wikimedia

Earlier this year, 12 cartoonists from French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo were massacred in a brutal terrorist attack. Al-Qaeda from Yemen claimed responsibility for the assault, arguing that the paper had published blasphemous images of the Prophet Mohammed. A debate over free speech and the role of satire raged then died out, until yesterday, when Charlie Hebdo announced that they would no longer be drawing the Prophet Mohammed in cartoons. While some accused them of pandering, for others, the decision comes as a relief.

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When Australia and its island state Tasmania signed the Tasmanian Forests Intergovernmental Agreement in 2011, it seemed to offer a peaceful conclusion to the fight over the country's natural forests that had raged for decades. That agreement, which expanded the protected area of Tasmanian forests and provided resources for logging companies to develop alternative plantation-based pulp production, may be in danger if Tasmania's new state government gets its way.

Will Hodgman, whose term as the premier of Tasmania started at the end of March, announced plans this week to repeal the agreement and open up around 400,000 previously protected hectares of forest for the timber industry.

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