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Food for Thinkers: Your Complete 16-Course Tasting Menu

Your handy bookmark-able guide to the all-you-can-read extravaganza of ideas, stories, opinions, and proposals that was GOOD's Food for Thinkers week.

Last week, as I hope some of you may have noticed, we hosted a six-day Food for Thinkers blogfest. With the launch of GOOD's new food hub, I wanted to stake out an expanded territory for food writing, and at the same time, start building a community of influences and inspiration.

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Food for Thinkers: Eating Rocks

Friends of the Pleistocene examine contemporary foodscapes for traces of geologic time, from seed vaults to radioactive salt.


Friends of the Pleistocene is a blog with an unusual, and unusually interesting, mission: to "create contexts and speculative tools for humans to recalibrate their sense of place within the geologic timescale." Reshaping cognitive pathways to grasp the multi-billion year timespans of geologic history is not just an idle thought experiment, according to Jamie Kruse and Elizabeth Ellsworth, the artists behind Friends of the Pleistocene. As they explained in a recent article on Urban Omnibus:

Modern life and deep geologic time are profoundly embedded within one another, with great consequence for both the present and the future. Humans are not only intimately living with—and rapidly using up—geologic material that took scores of millions of years to create, we are also laying down a new and utterly unique stratum on the earth. It's made up of human-made materials (including waste), and it will remain as one of earth's geologic layers long after our species is gone.

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Food for Thinkers: An Online Festival of Food and Writing

Six days, 48 writers—from space archaeologists to music bloggers, plus everything in between—and one topic: what makes food so interesting?


As promised, all this week GOOD's new Food hub will be hosting a blog festival—a multi-site online conversation looking at food writing from as broad and unusual a variety of perspectives as possible. Over the next six days, more than 40 of my favorite writers—from science bloggers and human rights reporters to design critics and food columnists—will be sharing their perspectives on what makes food so interesting.

We're calling it "Food For Thinkers," and although most of the participants will be posting on their own sites, you can keep up with the entire conversation here at GOOD Food HQ, where I'll be hosting links, adding my own responses, and asking for your comments. We'll also be using the Twitter hashtag #foodforthinkers on @GOODFoodHQ, if you prefer to follow along that way.

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