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New York City's Dirty 10,000 Get Paid To Clean Up

One percent of the city's buildings spew more soot than all its cars. Now New York has motivated banks to lend to landlords so they can clean up.


In America's largest city, buildings pollute more than cars. It's not a matter of numbers though, it's a matter of clean fuel, or the lack of it.

Just one percent of buildings in New York still burn heavy forms of heating oil, but those 10,000 polluters spew more soot than all the vehicle traffic in the whole city. "Upgrading these buildings to cleaner heating fuel is the single largest step New Yorkers can take to solve local air pollution,” Fred Krupp, president of Environmental Defense Fund, said in a statement.

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Never Inflate Your Car or Bike Tires Again—Soon, They'll Do It Themselves

Goodyear is developing self-inflating tires for trucks and cars, while a San Francisco startup wants to do the same for bikes


Humans are not naturally efficient beings. Despite our best three-cups-of-coffee, getting-things-done intentions, we meander, we forget, we waste. And in the aggregate, all these tiny sins—leaving the lights on, turning the air conditioning up, buying too much food at the grocery store—make us use more energy than we need to. Case in point: Drivers know somewhere in their brains that driving with tires at the proper pressure saves gas. But when was the last time you checked the pressure or reinflated them?

Sure, there are the super-humans among us that never forget about things like this. But most of us aren’t, which is why the U.S. Department of Energy gave Goodyear $1.5 million this month to work on tires that monitor their own pressure and inflate themselves.

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Airline Pilots Ditch Paper for iPads and Save Millions in Fuel

Pilots have to carry up to 35 pounds of paper on every flight. Leaving it behind makes a ton of sense.

At least two airlines are switching from paper to iPads in the cockpit, Marketwatch reports.

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