GOOD

Excretory Glory

In this installment of our Half-Baked Design Challenge, Eric Andre, Eric Yahnker, and more redesign the toilet.

During one particular late-night editorial meeting, when all of us here at GOOD HQ probably had a few too many, we came up with the idea to send briefs detailing global problems to some of our most creative friends with one simple instruction: to design a solution to the problem in less than 30 minutes, a time frame that would make them think about the problem, but limit the extent to which it might overwhelm them. Call it "The Half-Baked Design Challenge." Some of the solutions are comical. Some are super thoughtful. Some, to be perfectly frank, are mildly disturbing. But all of them engage creatively with a problem in search of a solution, and we think that's a good thing. In this installment, we redesign the toilet.

One out of every three people on the planet— 2.5 billion people in the world— don’t have access to a toilet. Yeah, we’re in deep doo-doo. About 1.4 million children worldwide die every year from contact with raw human feces. That averages out to one child every 20 seconds, more than the annual death tolls from AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined.

Keep Reading Show less
Features

A New Burger

In this installment of our Half-Baked Design Challenge, David Arquette, Dana Goodyear, and more redesign the Big Mac.

During one particular late-night editorial meeting, when all of us here at GOOD HQ probably had a few too many, we came up with the idea to send briefs detailing global problems to some of our most creative friends with one simple instruction: to design a solution to the problem in less than 30 minutes, a time frame that would make them think about the problem, but limit the extent to which it might overwhelm them. Call it "The Half-Baked Design Challenge." Some of the solutions are comical. Some are super thoughtful. Some, to be perfectly frank, are mildly disturbing. But all of them engage creatively with a problem in search of a solution, and we think that's a good thing. In this installment, we redesign the Big Mac.

Soon after the American fastfood chain Big Boy Restaurants pioneered a triple-decker burger in the 1960s, Jim Delligatti, owner of one of McDonald’s earliest franchises outside Pittsburgh, took wind of the newfangled creation and—lore has it—Hamburglared his own version in 1967. Within a year, the “Big Mac”—so named by Esther Glickstein Rose, a young advertising secretary who worked at McDonald’s corporate headquarters in Illinois—became so popular that the company added it to menus nationwide.

Keep Reading Show less
Features

Sexy Innovation

In this installment of our Half-Baked Design Challenge, Susie Essman, Nadia Manzoor, and more redesign the condom.

During one particular late-night editorial meeting, when all of us here at GOOD HQ probably had a few too many, we came up with the idea to send briefs detailing global problems to some of our most creative friends with one simple instruction: to design a solution to the problem in less than 30 minutes, a time frame that would make them think about the problem, but limit the extent to which it might overwhelm them. Call it "The Half-Baked Design Challenge." Some of the solutions are comical. Some are super thoughtful. Some, to be perfectly frank, are mildly disturbing. But all of them engage creatively with a problem in search of a solution, and we think that's a good thing. In this installment, we redesign the condom.

Two truths prevail about modern latex condoms. One, they are wonderfully effective at preventing unplanned pregnancy and preventing the transmission of diseases like HIV. Two, they are decidedly unsexy.

Keep Reading Show less
Features