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Yad Vashem

Since 1992, the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous has been holding reunion ceremonies between Holocaust survivors and rescuers once a year. But the tradition is coming to an end, as many have died or are too frail to travel. What might be the last reunion of its kind took place when a 92-year-old woman met up with the two surviving family members that she helped hide during the Holocaust, and their descendants.

Sarah Yanai and Yossi Mor introduced Melpomeni Dina (nee Gianopoulou) to their almost 40 family members, all decedents of the Mordechai family, the family of seven that Dina and her two sisters hid during WWII. "There are no words to describe this feeling," Dina told the Jeruselum Post. "It is very emotional for us to be together again."

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Culture
via Yad Vashem and Archive of Modern Conflict, 2007

In September 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland. By April 1940, the gates closed on the Lodz Ghetto, the second largest in the country after Warsaw.

Throughout the war, over 210,000 people would be imprisoned in Lodz.

Among those held captive was Henryk Ross. He was a Jewish sports photographer before the Nazi invasion and worked for the the ghetto's Department of Statistics during the war. As part of his official job, he took identification photos of the prisoners and propaganda shots of Lodz' textile and leather factories.

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Communities

Holocaust Survivors Turn to Holograms to Preserve Their Stories

A new initiative ensures future generations will have the opportunity to interact with an important piece of history.

image via youtube screen capture

I remember the first time I saw Henry’s arm. I was in grade school, and he was in his late 70’s. My teacher had invited Henry to our class so we could hear, first hand, his story of horror and survival, of hardship and liberation. We sat in a circle on the floor while Henry described how, as a young Jew in Berlin, he’d been rounded up and sent to Auschwitz, where he endured terrors our developing minds could only begin to understand. What we could understand, though, were the faint blue digits etched into his arm, which he showed us, one by one, when he’d finished speaking. The numbers, he explained, were a reminder of how low people could sink, as well as how high they could climb afterwards.

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Articles

Change Only Happens When We Come Together

A visit to the Museum of Tolerance and to 3 World's Cafe taught us that change only happens when we come together.

Growing up in a low-income community, it's easy to see first-hand what the effects of prejudice really look like. We have neighborhoods and schools that are still segregated, gang violence, and we live in food deserts. It feels like no one cares about our suffering and that people who have more are fine with our communities being this way. And when you turn on the news, you only hear that we are lazy, violent, and uneducated. They say we're a menace to society. This week, spending time at the Museum of Tolerance on Los Angeles' Westside and at 3 Worlds Cafe in South Los Angeles made us reflect on how the kind of hatred that created the Holocaust affects our community today.

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Articles

Four Hundred Rabbis Tell Glenn Beck to Stop Referencing the Holocaust

Four hundred rabbis have teamed up to tell Fox News to stop referencing the Holocaust to denigrate its opponents, and Fox News doesn't care.


It sounds like the start of a joke—"400 rabbis get together to write a note..."—but there's no punch-line to this one. Four hundred rabbis, including every leader from every branch of Judaism in the United States, have signed their name to a full-page letter in today's Wall Street Journal asking the NewsCorp CEO Rupert Murdoch to rebuke two of his employees: Roger Ailes, the president of Fox News, and Glenn Beck, the right-wing channel's most infamous host.

Galvanizing the rabbis is Ailes' and Beck's continued insistence on alluding to Nazism and the Holocaust in interviews and during broadcasts. Ailes recently called NPR executives "Nazis" for firing the political analyst Juan Williams after he said he's afraid to fly with people in "Muslim garb." And Beck's tactic of likening opponents to fascists is quite well-known in most left-leaning circles. Such comparisons, say the rabbis, are so inapt as to diminish the real horrors of Nazism.

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