GOOD

6 Innovative Designs from the “World Cup of Drones”

These unmanned aerial vehicles are designed to make the world a better place.

For many people around the world, particularly those who live in conflict zones, drones evoke violence and pain than they do goodwill. But the power and potential of drone technology can be harnessed towards purposes outside the military and security surveillance industries. This idea—that drone technology isn’t just war technology—was what fuelled the spirit of Dubai’s first-ever Drones for Good challenge, a yearlong competition in which innovators redesigned the drone for a better world. The unprecedented competition is being called “The World Cup of Drones” by a breathless international press.

Thirty contestants—chosen from a submission pool of 800—battled it out last week at the two-day long final round for a grand prize of 1 million AED (about $272,245 U.S.) for local residents and a grand prize of $1 million U.S for international competitors. A third category existed for the best design for government-service drones.

Keep Reading Show less
Slideshows

12 Days of Architecture: Two #GiveADamn Books

This year, Architecture for Humanity released the follow-up to their successful Design Like You Give a Damn book.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The Design Difference: In Brownsville, Enormous Urban Challenges, and Hope

How can design help create change in New York City's Brownsville neighborhood? The first in our three-part series on The Design Difference.

GOOD was asked to attend The Design Difference, a charrette held by the Japan Society, Common Ground, and the Designers Accord. In this series, we're examining design solutions to social problems and ways for designers to contribute pro bono work for the proposed solutions.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Sponsor A Day of Design

Support Architecture for Humanity by sponsoring a day of design.



Over a decade ago, when humanitarian design got little media coverage and was thought by many to be the poor relation of "real design" there emerged the fearless and groundbreaking non-profit, Architecture for Humanity. Co-founded by Cameron Sinclair and Kate Stohr, who left rather more high profile jobs in New York City to run the then super tiny non-profit from an equally tiny studio apartment, AFH has grown considerably in its reach, influence, and number of projects. Today, big personalities and major design consultancies take on (or try to take on) the humanitarian projects that AFH has been involved in for years but no one does it quite like AFH. Who else can claim to have completed a project on every continent of the world for three years running?

In 2010 alone, over 81,000 people benefited directly from the work of AFH. As Sinclair explains, they weren't just inspired by it "but actually living, healing, learning or working in structures designed and constructed by our teams of building professionals." This year's 53 projects included community facility building in Chile and Kenya, post-disaster reconstruction in Haiti and Pakistan, low cost health clinics in India, and youth sports development work in Brazil, Mali, and Namibia. In previous years they've built soccer fields (like the Baguineda Football for Hope Centre shown above), skate parks, sustainable schools, mobile health clinics and model homes among other important projects.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKmt7PwYPCY

This week at the Venice Biennale, three finalists were named for the Curry Stone Design Prize, a no-strings $100,000 grant honoring a visionary design initiative. The three nominees are Maya Pedal, a nonprofit organization that builds "Bicimaquinas," bicycle-powered agricultural machines in Guatemala; ELEMENTAL, a system of inner city public housing in Chile that allows residents to easily expand and individualize their spaces; and the project above by Sustainable Health Enterprises, which hopes to bring safe, affordable sanitary pads to women in developing nations. As the video explains, it's estimated that women lose up to 50 day of work per year because they can't afford them. In partnership with a group of collaborators in Rwanda, founder Elizabeth Scharpf is manufacturing a line of feminine hygiene products made from locally-sourced banana leaf fiber.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles