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After the Copenhagen Synagogue Shooting, This Muslim Community Is Responding in the Best Way Possible

A “Friendship Ring” made up of hundreds of people will surround an Oslo synagogue while worshipers pray.

image via (cc) flickr user sam-_-

The past several months have seen a series of attacks aimed at Jewish businesses and places of worship across Europe, including—but not limited to—the horrific murder of Jews buying groceries in a Paris market, and the recent shooting death of a volunteer security guard at Copenhagen’s Central Synagogue. In response to those acts of violence perpetrated against Jews, the Muslim community in Oslo, Norway is standing up—literally—to support and defend their Jewish neighbors.

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“Mom, Dad, There is No God.” Coming Out as a Non-Believer

The increasingly common experience of ‘coming out’ as an atheist carries its own challenges.


As we approach adulthood, there are a number of hard talks people must have with their parents—about sexual orientation, about living your own dreams (and not those of Mom and Dad), about what we really believe. Those moments of truth help transition many of us from being the person our parents thought we’d be, to accepting ourselves for who we really are. But coming out, and opening up, always comes with the risk of rejection.

Christy Meyer was home-schooled with a religiously-based curriculum that taught reading, writing, morality, and that the Earth is 6,000 years old. At age 12, Meyer made her first non-home-schooled friends, and when a new pal, from a mixed Buddhist and Muslim family asked, “Do you think that I’m going to hell?” Meyer had to answer, “Yes.” She soon realized other good people around the world, who by the accident of circumstance were not Christian, would also be damned according to her belief system. “That was so jarring for me. And I really look back at that as a pivotal moment.”

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Four Hundred Rabbis Tell Glenn Beck to Stop Referencing the Holocaust

Four hundred rabbis have teamed up to tell Fox News to stop referencing the Holocaust to denigrate its opponents, and Fox News doesn't care.


It sounds like the start of a joke—"400 rabbis get together to write a note..."—but there's no punch-line to this one. Four hundred rabbis, including every leader from every branch of Judaism in the United States, have signed their name to a full-page letter in today's Wall Street Journal asking the NewsCorp CEO Rupert Murdoch to rebuke two of his employees: Roger Ailes, the president of Fox News, and Glenn Beck, the right-wing channel's most infamous host.

Galvanizing the rabbis is Ailes' and Beck's continued insistence on alluding to Nazism and the Holocaust in interviews and during broadcasts. Ailes recently called NPR executives "Nazis" for firing the political analyst Juan Williams after he said he's afraid to fly with people in "Muslim garb." And Beck's tactic of likening opponents to fascists is quite well-known in most left-leaning circles. Such comparisons, say the rabbis, are so inapt as to diminish the real horrors of Nazism.

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