GOOD

John Oliver Takes On America’s Terrible Maternity Leave Policies

The best gift for mom this season is federal laws mandating paid maternity leave.

The US has some of the worst maternity leave policies in the world—federal laws only require that companies give new mothers 12 unpaid weeks off. It’s an urgently important issue that doesn’t get much speech-play these days. But John Oliver made it the focus of his Mother’s Day episode of Last Week Tonight on Sunday, highlighting the hypocritical contradiction in a culture that celebrates mothers with a billion-dollar greeting card industry but won’t lend them the financial support they need to be present mothers.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Do You Know Your Company’s Maternity Leave Policy? Submit it to This Tumblr.

The U.S. has some of the worst family leave policies in the world.

Portrait of a pregnant lady who probably didn’t have paid maternity leave either (because she was as rich as God, probably). Image via Wikimedia Commons/attributed to artist Marcus Gheeraerts.

The U.S. has some of the most pitiful family leave laws—in fact, it’s only one of four countries in the entire world that does not offer paid leave for new mothers (other countries are Papua New Guinea, Lesotho, and Swaziland). So, because there are no laws enforcing paid leave and other pretty basic benefits, family leave policies tend to vary wildly from company to company, based on the whims of the company’s leadership.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Intel Wants You To Bond With Your Baby

The technology giant joins other white-collar U.S. businesses offering expanded family leave time, as President Obama makes it a priority.

Photo via Parent Map Magazine

Technology giant Intel announced on Friday that new parents will receive eight weeks “bonding” leave, in addition to their existing policy of 13 paid weeks of maternity leave, the San Jose Mercury News reported. Both mothers and fathers can take advantage of this bonding leave time, which can be used any time within the first year after the birth, adoption, or foster care placement of the child.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles