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At 76, Jonathan Kozol Is More Outraged Over Inequality in Education Than Ever

Education activist Jonathan Kozol is letting loose on child poverty, racism, and educational inequity these days.

"Sorry, I didn't mean to get so angry," author and education activist Jonathan Kozol told a crowd of mostly educators in Los Angeles on Monday night. The teachers, many toting dog-eared copies of Savage Inequalities, Kozol's groundbreaking 1991 text which exposed in heartbreaking detail the education disparities between wealthier, whiter students and poor, minority kids, didn't need the apology. Instead they applauded Kozol, who is on a nationwide lecture tour promoting his 13th tome, Fire in the Ashes, for sustaining his moral outrage over child poverty, racism, and educational inequity for the past 40 years.

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Can the Promise of a Fatter Paycheck Lure Minority Students into STEM Majors?

They can earn 50 percent more than minorities humanities majors.


It's well known that college graduates with science, technology, engineering or math degrees tend to earn higher salaries than their peers who were English majors. According to a study by the University of Southern California, minority students get an especially significant salary boost from majoring in a STEM subject, even if they don't end up working in a STEM field after graduation.

Researchers spent nine years following the career trajectories of over 1,000 Asian, Pacific Islander, black, and Latino students who were scholarship applicants for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Gates Millennium Scholars Program. They found that students from those racial and ethnic backgrounds who major in STEM earn 25 percent more after graduation than those who don't, and if they do work in a field related to their STEM degree, they earn at least 50 percent more.

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Pilot Program Aims to Level the Advanced Placement Playing Field for Low-Income Students

The College Board, which administers AP exams, is bringing AP courses to 200 under-served high schools across California.


With college tuition skyrocketing, one good way for students to cut costs is to earn college credit through Advanced Placement courses and exams in high school. But not all schools offer the same number of AP classes, and poor kids of color tend to have the least access.

In an effort to remedy this inequity, the College Board, which administers AP exams, is launching the California AP Potential Expansion, a pilot program that will bring AP courses to 200 under-served high schools across the Golden State. Teachers will participate in an intensive summer training institute and receive ongoing professional development. Participating schools—which must commit to offering at least one new AP course for each of three years—will also receive funding for textbooks and course materials through nonprofit partnerships. The program will identify what the College Board calls "diamond-in-the-rough" students who might develop their potential in AP classes.

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How the Science World Tells Black Kids 'Do Not Enter'

National initiatives seek to increase the number of minorities in science, but racial discrimination in academia is hurting the cause.


Back in 2009, President Obama launched his "Educate to Innovate" program, tasked with increasing the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering and math careers. And with students of color set to make up the majority in American schools by 2050, efforts focused on prepping them to become the next generation of scientists are gaining momentum. But the racial discrimination and a lack of opportunity for minorities working in science academia probably isn't helping the cause.

A new study released on Thursday from Science magazine found that black academics applying for biomedical research grants from the National Institutes of Health are significantly less likely to receive funding than their white peers. One-quarter of white researchers' proposals are accepted for funding, while black scientists only get the money they need 15 percent of the time.

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