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Stay-at-Home Dad Wins Right to Farm His Frontyard

With the help of a libertarian lawyer, Karl Tricamo can continue growing eggplant and tomatoes where other people might just push a mower.

Urban farmers as outlaws: It's becoming a familiar tale. Whether it's a $2,500 fine for growing chard in Oakland or bans on backyard chickens in Pensacola, the civic agrarian often bumps up against the cold hard edge of the law. Public opinion may have shifted far enough in some cities to actually reshape zoning laws to allow for farms in vacant lots and other unused spaces, but plenty of ag-minded urbanites in less progressive burgs still toil in their vegetable trenches shaking their garden-gloved fists at the man.

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Open-Source Blueprints Explain How to Rebuild Civilization

Getting off the grid is an intimidating idea. Open Source Ecology intends to make it a bit more accessible.

Creating a commune from scratch is no joke: despite his crunchiest intentions, man cannot live on kale alone. If an intentional community wants to make bread, they'll need a combine to harvest grain. If they want wood beams for building homes, they'll need a sawmill. These technological requirements for even the simplest modern civilizations are the inspiration behind Open Source Ecology, an agricultural commune and machinist collaborative that goes beyond the mission of getting off the grid: It seeks to rebuild society from the ground up.

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Laughter's the Best Medicine: Comic Books to Help Joplin Kids Be Kids

A new comic book intends to help Joplin youth cope with life in a destroyed city by making them smile.

Whether created to educate students in Kabul or fight unemployment in New York City, comic books have become a go-to creative instrument for tackling serious problems. Now a team of artists is putting comic books to work in support of the young people in Joplin, Missouri affected by last month's tornadoes, which killed more than 100 people and displaced thousands.

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