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These Emergency Shelters Made From Earthquake Rubble Will Inspire You

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban responds to the post-quake crisis in Nepal with brilliant design.

When large-scale, whole-region-engulfing tragedy hits, humanity is lucky to have an architect like Shigeru Ban. In the past, his disaster relief designs and inventive use of eco-friendly materials, like water-proof and fire-proof paper tubes, have helped countries like his native Japan bounce back from catastrophe. For his newest project, the former winner of the prestigious Pritzker Prize has funneled his formidable talent into the creation of an ambitious plan: a way to turn salvaged brick from earthquakes into temporary relief shelters. When April’s 7.8 magnitude Nepal earthquake shook the traditionally peaceful region, Ban went to work outlining a series of blueprints for modular shelters made of wooden frameworks filled in with brick rubble. Though the announcement was made in May, it’s only this week that we’ve finally been able to peek at what’s to come.

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Our City is Devastated. We Are Not.

The international press saw hopelessness, but these kids saw hope. See their city through their eyes in our Summer Issue cover story.

In April, Winston Struye was taking a taxi from eastern Nepal to Darjeeling, India, when a 7.9-magnitude earthquake hit central Nepal. The 24-year-old photographer immediately thought of his students back in Kathmandu and feared the worst. Just four days earlier, he had been in the Nepali capital, finishing a photography project at the ROKPA Children’s Home, helping a group of former street children document their daily lives through photography and learn the power of storytelling. Returning to Kathmandu two days after the quake, Struye found the city piecing itself back together. Corner stores were reopening, teahouses were filled with patrons, and though they were justifiably shaken, his former students were playing poker the way they had before the quake. This sense of resilience clashed with stories in the international media, which focused on wanton destruction, rising death tolls, and impending outbreaks of disease of Haiti-like proportions. Struye knew there was a side of the story not being told, so he gathered his students, showed them how Kathmandu was being depicted, and gave them an assignment: Show the world the side of their home not being shared. The destruction in Nepal’s capital was tremendous, but as the photos taken by Struye’s students communicate, so too is the spirit of its residents.

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How You Can Lend Your Support to Nepal

You don’t need money to help out.

A devestating earthquake rocked Nepal over the weekend. Photo via Flickr user Domenico.

Organizations That Don’t Require Your Money

Image via Micromappers

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Travel does many things to you. In committing to the open path, to the adventure of the unknown, it brings the possibility of opportunity and a liberated mind that can take you anywhere. Our journey took us to the Himalayas and Nepal. This is where our journey into the juicing world began.

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